This summer, thousands upon thousands of people; black, white, Hispanic, Arabic, American Indian, were arm in arm, some with masks, others without masks, as they protested and marched the streets in cities across the country. The movement, in response to the slaying of George Floyd by Minnesota police, Bryonne Taylor, an EMT killed by Louisville, KY police while in her home by way of a no-Knock search order, and many others, was, at times, violent and on other occasions, riveting, as this country watched and shared in the grief and the outrage that gripped this nation. A news video posted July 10th confirmed that the police who entered Bryonne Taylor's home had been granted a no-knock search warrant for a different residence. ﷯Those who rose up are, in fact, today's heroes, today's freedom fighters, today's voice, today's motivation and tomorrow's hope. This summer I found a post on the Internet of a black minister was shot in Georgia by police while jogging. I was outraged. That same day I witnessed a bus driver driver turn the bus around to drive back to pick up two black American women who appeared to need a ride. With a detour off the normal route and a courteous and respectful style of communication, he went out of his way to assist them and brought them to their location. I was reminded of a speech I heard from President Gerald R. Ford when I was twelve years old. It was 1975. At the time, there were gangs and racial riots at the high school level and beyond. Many lives were taken for no reason other than the difference in the color of one's skin. Some of those lives were teenagers. Racism was rampant. President Ford called upon the people of this nation to end racism. He said, do not fight racism with anger or violence. He said that we must fight racism with mutual respect and brotherly love. He explained that racial slurs invite and legitimize racism in the hearts and minds of those who are truly racist and told people that use racial slurs to stop. He explained to this country that those who use racial slurs for the sake of humor aren't racist and to not confuse those who are making jokes with those who would literally subjugate a group of people to a lessor status, to be without the same rights and privileges that we all enjoy. He referred to acts of kindness as a counterbalance that might, in some way, make up for the degradation and de-humanization that righteously sparks outrage amongst those that have been wronged. President Ford said that if you see a black women entering a doorway to open the door for her, as a way of somehow wiping away some degree of the injustice upon her and some degree of racism with it. He spoke that anger and violence add to racist beliefs and do not provide a counterweight. I was a kid, living in Rockville, MD at the time. I had seen the street in front of my house filled with young people of all color, religion and ethnic origin running as fast as they could from police who chased them with Billy clubs. The seventies brought with it an enlightened youth and populace that marked a turning for racism. It was kindness, mutual respect and open-mindedness amongst people of all color, gender, ethnic origin, religion and economic status that won societal acceptance. Racism was pushed out of the sphere of public acceptance. Media and entertainment shifted to promote enlightened acceptance among peoples, interracial relationships, freedom of lifestyle. Racism is the belief or the attempt to subjugate a people with regard to their human rights and includes the belief that a race or a people are of lesser value, ability or substance. A bigot believes that a race or a people are of lesser value, ability or substance- without the attempt to subjugate. People that are racist are a VAST minority in today's society. Such people are ostracized in mainstream America. Racism is NOT a part of this country’s culture or ethic. Racism does not exist in Democracy. Racism does not exist in this country’s doctrine or ideology. It does not exist in corporate boardrooms or classrooms, or small town hall meetings, or the local diner, or the fitness club or the local supermarket. It does not exist in the workplace, the school or local, municipal or federal government. This year's protests have convinced many elected to federal office and those seeking to hold office to act. Changes in law enforcement procedure, screening, and training need to be effected immediately. Law enforcement persons are not immune to the law. Changes also need to include full accountability with respect to the law, especially when there is a loss of life in the line of duty. If elected I would work to make law enforcement accountable before the law, require periodic assessments and screening as well discover a level of uniformity of police procedure that protects all Americans rights to safety and liberty, no matter what their color, gender, creed, ethnicity, economic status, religion, sexual orientation, lifestyle or political affiliation may be.

A Counterbalance to Racism in America

This summer, thousands upon thousands of people; black, white, Hispanic, Arabic, American Indian, were arm in arm, some with masks, others without masks, as they protested and marched the streets in cities across the country. The movement, in response to the slaying of George Floyd by Minnesota police, Bryonne Taylor, an EMT killed by Louisville, KY police while in her home by way of a no-Knock search order, and many others, was, at times, violent and on other occasions, riveting, as this country watched and shared in the grief and the outrage that gripped this nation. A news video posted July 10th confirmed that the police who entered Bryonne Taylor's home had been granted a no-knock search warrant for a different residence. ﷯Those who rose up are, in fact, today's heroes, today's freedom fighters, today's voice, today's motivation and tomorrow's hope. This summer I found a post on the Internet of a black minister was shot in Georgia by police while jogging. I was outraged. That same day I witnessed a bus driver driver turn the bus around to drive back to pick up two black American women who appeared to need a ride. With a detour off the normal route and a courteous and respectful style of communication, he went out of his way to assist them and brought them to their location. I was reminded of a speech I heard from President Gerald R. Ford when I was twelve years old. It was 1975. At the time, there were gangs and racial riots at the high school level and beyond. Many lives were taken for no reason other than the difference in the color of one's skin. Some of those lives were teenagers. Racism was rampant. President Ford called upon the people of this nation to end racism. He said, do not fight racism with anger or violence. He said that we must fight racism with mutual respect and brotherly love. He explained that racial slurs invite and legitimize racism in the hearts and minds of those who are truly racist and told people that use racial slurs to stop. He explained to this country that those who use racial slurs for the sake of humor aren't racist and to not confuse those who are making jokes with those who would literally subjugate a group of people to a lessor status, to be without the same rights and privileges that we all enjoy. He referred to acts of kindness as a counterbalance that might, in some way, make up for the degradation and de-humanization that righteously sparks outrage amongst those that have been wronged. President Ford said that if you see a black women entering a doorway to open the door for her, as a way of somehow wiping away some degree of the injustice upon her and some degree of racism with it. He spoke that anger and violence add to racist beliefs and do not provide a counterweight. I was a kid, living in Rockville, MD at the time. I had seen the street in front of my house filled with young people of all color, religion and ethnic origin running as fast as they could from police who chased them with Billy clubs. The seventies brought with it an enlightened youth and populace that marked a turning for racism. It was kindness, mutual respect and open-mindedness amongst people of all color, gender, ethnic origin, religion and economic status that won societal acceptance. Racism was pushed out of the sphere of public acceptance. Media and entertainment shifted to promote enlightened acceptance among peoples, interracial relationships, freedom of lifestyle. Racism is the belief or the attempt to subjugate a people with regard to their human rights and includes the belief that a race or a people are of lesser value, ability or substance. A bigot believes that a race or a people are of lesser value, ability or substance- without the attempt to subjugate. People that are racist are a VAST minority in today's society. Such people are ostracized in mainstream America. Racism is NOT a part of this country’s culture or ethic. Racism does not exist in Democracy. Racism does not exist in this country’s doctrine or ideology. It does not exist in corporate boardrooms or classrooms, or small town hall meetings, or the local diner, or the fitness club or the local supermarket. It does not exist in the workplace, the school or local, municipal or federal government. This year's protests have convinced many elected to federal office and those seeking to hold office to act. Changes in law enforcement procedure, screening, and training need to be effected immediately. Law enforcement persons are not immune to the law. Changes also need to include full accountability with respect to the law, especially when there is a loss of life in the line of duty. If elected I would work to make law enforcement accountable before the law, require periodic assessments and screening as well discover a level of uniformity of police procedure that protects all Americans rights to safety and liberty, no matter what their color, gender, creed, ethnicity, economic status, religion, sexual orientation, lifestyle or political affiliation may be.
This summer, thousands upon thousands of people; black, white, Hispanic, Arabic, American Indian, were arm in arm, some with masks, others without masks, as they protested and marched the streets in cities across the country. The movement, in response to the slaying of George Floyd by Minnesota police, Bryonne Taylor, an EMT killed by Louisville, KY police while in her home by way of a no-Knock search order, and many others, was, at times, violent and on other occasions, riveting, as this country watched and shared in the grief and the outrage that gripped this nation. A news video posted July 10th confirmed that the police who entered Bryonne Taylor's home had been granted a no-knock search warrant for a different residence. ﷯Those who rose up are, in fact, today's heroes, today's freedom fighters, today's voice, today's motivation and tomorrow's hope. This summer I found a post on the Internet of a black minister was shot in Georgia by police while jogging. I was outraged. That same day I witnessed a bus driver driver turn the bus around to drive back to pick up two black American women who appeared to need a ride. With a detour off the normal route and a courteous and respectful style of communication, he went out of his way to assist them and brought them to their location. I was reminded of a speech I heard from President Gerald R. Ford when I was twelve years old. It was 1975. At the time, there were gangs and racial riots at the high school level and beyond. Many lives were taken for no reason other than the difference in the color of one's skin. Some of those lives were teenagers. Racism was rampant. President Ford called upon the people of this nation to end racism. He said, do not fight racism with anger or violence. He said that we must fight racism with mutual respect and brotherly love. He explained that racial slurs invite and legitimize racism in the hearts and minds of those who are truly racist and told people that use racial slurs to stop. He explained to this country that those who use racial slurs for the sake of humor aren't racist and to not confuse those who are making jokes with those who would literally subjugate a group of people to a lessor status, to be without the same rights and privileges that we all enjoy. He referred to acts of kindness as a counterbalance that might, in some way, make up for the degradation and de-humanization that righteously sparks outrage amongst those that have been wronged. President Ford said that if you see a black women entering a doorway to open the door for her, as a way of somehow wiping away some degree of the injustice upon her and some degree of racism with it. He spoke that anger and violence add to racist beliefs and do not provide a counterweight. I was a kid, living in Rockville, MD at the time. I had seen the street in front of my house filled with young people of all color, religion and ethnic origin running as fast as they could from police who chased them with Billy clubs. The seventies brought with it an enlightened youth and populace that marked a turning for racism. It was kindness, mutual respect and open-mindedness amongst people of all color, gender, ethnic origin, religion and economic status that won societal acceptance. Racism was pushed out of the sphere of public acceptance. Media and entertainment shifted to promote enlightened acceptance among peoples, interracial relationships, freedom of lifestyle. Racism is the belief or the attempt to subjugate a people with regard to their human rights and includes the belief that a race or a people are of lesser value, ability or substance. A bigot believes that a race or a people are of lesser value, ability or substance- without the attempt to subjugate. People that are racist are a VAST minority in today's society. Such people are ostracized in mainstream America. Racism is NOT a part of this country’s culture or ethic. Racism does not exist in Democracy. Racism does not exist in this country’s doctrine or ideology. It does not exist in corporate boardrooms or classrooms, or small town hall meetings, or the local diner, or the fitness club or the local supermarket. It does not exist in the workplace, the school or local, municipal or federal government. This year's protests have convinced many elected to federal office and those seeking to hold office to act. Changes in law enforcement procedure, screening, and training need to be effected immediately. Law enforcement persons are not immune to the law. Changes also need to include full accountability with respect to the law, especially when there is a loss of life in the line of duty. If elected I would work to make law enforcement accountable before the law, require periodic assessments and screening as well discover a level of uniformity of police procedure that protects all Americans rights to safety and liberty, no matter what their color, gender, creed, ethnicity, economic status, religion, sexual orientation, lifestyle or political affiliation may be.
This summer, thousands upon thousands of people; black, white, Hispanic, Arabic, American Indian, were arm in arm, some with masks, others without masks, as they protested and marched the streets in cities across the country. The movement, in response to the slaying of George Floyd by Minnesota police, Bryonne Taylor, an EMT killed by Louisville, KY police while in her home by way of a no-Knock search order, and many others, was, at times, violent and on other occasions, riveting, as this country watched and shared in the grief and the outrage that gripped this nation. A news video posted July 10th confirmed that the police who entered Bryonne Taylor's home had been granted a no-knock search warrant for a different residence. ﷯Those who rose up are, in fact, today's heroes, today's freedom fighters, today's voice, today's motivation and tomorrow's hope. This summer I found a post on the Internet of a black minister was shot in Georgia by police while jogging. I was outraged. That same day I witnessed a bus driver driver turn the bus around to drive back to pick up two black American women who appeared to need a ride. With a detour off the normal route and a courteous and respectful style of communication, he went out of his way to assist them and brought them to their location. I was reminded of a speech I heard from President Gerald R. Ford when I was twelve years old. It was 1975. At the time, there were gangs and racial riots at the high school level and beyond. Many lives were taken for no reason other than the difference in the color of one's skin. Some of those lives were teenagers. Racism was rampant. President Ford called upon the people of this nation to end racism. He said, do not fight racism with anger or violence. He said that we must fight racism with mutual respect and brotherly love. He explained that racial slurs invite and legitimize racism in the hearts and minds of those who are truly racist and told people that use racial slurs to stop. He explained to this country that those who use racial slurs for the sake of humor aren't racist and to not confuse those who are making jokes with those who would literally subjugate a group of people to a lessor status, to be without the same rights and privileges that we all enjoy. He referred to acts of kindness as a counterbalance that might, in some way, make up for the degradation and de-humanization that righteously sparks outrage amongst those that have been wronged. President Ford said that if you see a black women entering a doorway to open the door for her, as a way of somehow wiping away some degree of the injustice upon her and some degree of racism with it. He spoke that anger and violence add to racist beliefs and do not provide a counterweight. I was a kid, living in Rockville, MD at the time. I had seen the street in front of my house filled with young people of all color, religion and ethnic origin running as fast as they could from police who chased them with Billy clubs. The seventies brought with it an enlightened youth and populace that marked a turning for racism. It was kindness, mutual respect and open-mindedness amongst people of all color, gender, ethnic origin, religion and economic status that won societal acceptance. Racism was pushed out of the sphere of public acceptance. Media and entertainment shifted to promote enlightened acceptance among peoples, interracial relationships, freedom of lifestyle. Racism is the belief or the attempt to subjugate a people with regard to their human rights and includes the belief that a race or a people are of lesser value, ability or substance. A bigot believes that a race or a people are of lesser value, ability or substance- without the attempt to subjugate. People that are racist are a VAST minority in today's society. Such people are ostracized in mainstream America. Racism is NOT a part of this country’s culture or ethic. Racism does not exist in Democracy. Racism does not exist in this country’s doctrine or ideology. It does not exist in corporate boardrooms or classrooms, or small town hall meetings, or the local diner, or the fitness club or the local supermarket. It does not exist in the workplace, the school or local, municipal or federal government. This year's protests have convinced many elected to federal office and those seeking to hold office to act. Changes in law enforcement procedure, screening, and training need to be effected immediately. Law enforcement persons are not immune to the law. Changes also need to include full accountability with respect to the law, especially when there is a loss of life in the line of duty. If elected I would work to make law enforcement accountable before the law, require periodic assessments and screening as well discover a level of uniformity of police procedure that protects all Americans rights to safety and liberty, no matter what their color, gender, creed, ethnicity, economic status, religion, sexual orientation, lifestyle or political affiliation may be.
This summer, thousands upon thousands of people; black, white, Hispanic, Arabic, American Indian, were arm in arm, some with masks, others without masks, as they protested and marched the streets in cities across the country. The movement, in response to the slaying of George Floyd by Minnesota police, Bryonne Taylor, an EMT killed by Louisville, KY police while in her home by way of a no-Knock search order, and many others, was, at times, violent and on other occasions, riveting, as this country watched and shared in the grief and the outrage that gripped this nation. A news video posted July 10th confirmed that the police who entered Bryonne Taylor's home had been granted a no-knock search warrant for a different residence. ﷯Those who rose up are, in fact, today's heroes, today's freedom fighters, today's voice, today's motivation and tomorrow's hope. This summer I found a post on the Internet of a black minister was shot in Georgia by police while jogging. I was outraged. That same day I witnessed a bus driver driver turn the bus around to drive back to pick up two black American women who appeared to need a ride. With a detour off the normal route and a courteous and respectful style of communication, he went out of his way to assist them and brought them to their location. I was reminded of a speech I heard from President Gerald R. Ford when I was twelve years old. It was 1975. At the time, there were gangs and racial riots at the high school level and beyond. Many lives were taken for no reason other than the difference in the color of one's skin. Some of those lives were teenagers. Racism was rampant. President Ford called upon the people of this nation to end racism. He said, do not fight racism with anger or violence. He said that we must fight racism with mutual respect and brotherly love. He explained that racial slurs invite and legitimize racism in the hearts and minds of those who are truly racist and told people that use racial slurs to stop. He explained to this country that those who use racial slurs for the sake of humor aren't racist and to not confuse those who are making jokes with those who would literally subjugate a group of people to a lessor status, to be without the same rights and privileges that we all enjoy. He referred to acts of kindness as a counterbalance that might, in some way, make up for the degradation and de-humanization that righteously sparks outrage amongst those that have been wronged. President Ford said that if you see a black women entering a doorway to open the door for her, as a way of somehow wiping away some degree of the injustice upon her and some degree of racism with it. He spoke that anger and violence add to racist beliefs and do not provide a counterweight. I was a kid, living in Rockville, MD at the time. I had seen the street in front of my house filled with young people of all color, religion and ethnic origin running as fast as they could from police who chased them with Billy clubs. The seventies brought with it an enlightened youth and populace that marked a turning for racism. It was kindness, mutual respect and open-mindedness amongst people of all color, gender, ethnic origin, religion and economic status that won societal acceptance. Racism was pushed out of the sphere of public acceptance. Media and entertainment shifted to promote enlightened acceptance among peoples, interracial relationships, freedom of lifestyle. Racism is the belief or the attempt to subjugate a people with regard to their human rights and includes the belief that a race or a people are of lesser value, ability or substance. A bigot believes that a race or a people are of lesser value, ability or substance- without the attempt to subjugate. People that are racist are a VAST minority in today's society. Such people are ostracized in mainstream America. Racism is NOT a part of this country’s culture or ethic. Racism does not exist in Democracy. Racism does not exist in this country’s doctrine or ideology. It does not exist in corporate boardrooms or classrooms, or small town hall meetings, or the local diner, or the fitness club or the local supermarket. It does not exist in the workplace, the school or local, municipal or federal government. This year's protests have convinced many elected to federal office and those seeking to hold office to act. Changes in law enforcement procedure, screening, and training need to be effected immediately. Law enforcement persons are not immune to the law. Changes also need to include full accountability with respect to the law, especially when there is a loss of life in the line of duty. If elected I would work to make law enforcement accountable before the law, require periodic assessments and screening as well discover a level of uniformity of police procedure that protects all Americans rights to safety and liberty, no matter what their color, gender, creed, ethnicity, economic status, religion, sexual orientation, lifestyle or political affiliation may be.