How Free are the Citizens of Socialist Countries? In socialist countries, the federal government provides, health care, primary and secondary education, affordable housing and employment. The government is, very often, the employer, the landlord, the health care provider and educational instructor. Sound like a dream come true? No. While medical care practices are, by and large, uniform, choice of secondary course of study is generally limited to one or several choices based upon a student's performance on aptitude tests. Affordable housing refers to apartment dwellings that are typically modest and uniform. One's employment is based upon school performance, in the case of Russia performance during their mandatory two years of either civil or military service, and only one or several choices may be provided. Advancement opportunities may exist through the application process available at your local government administrator for employment. Entrepreneurship, to a degree, exists in many socialist countries. The process of opening a business generally includes approval by the corresponding government entity with regard to one's party loyalty, education and, in the case of Denmark, one's religion. Entrepreneurship, when permitted,, typically involves only a modest to moderate level of businesses activity. Outcry, criticism, legislative action designed to allow for substantial progress in socialist countries is, in many cases, non-existent. Why? Because to organize in political opposition to the existing framework of government is unconstitutional and highly illegal. Even to criticize in public is unconstitutional. Where? Quebec, Russia, China and Denmark, to name a few. Here's an excerpt from Quebec's Charter of Rights and Freedoms. 9.1 In exercising his fundamental freedoms and rights, a person shall maintain regard for.... state laicity, public order... In this respect, the scope of the freedoms and rights, and limits to their exercise, may be fixed by law. While the Constitution of the Russian Federation protects political freedom, there is also inherent in its framework, language that precludes persons from affecting political change. Article 13.5 The creation and activities of public associations whose aims and actions are aimed at a forced change of the fundamental principles of the constitutional system and at violating the integrity of the Russian Federation, at undermining its security, at setting up armed units, and at instigating social, racial, national and religious strife shall be prohibited. Also- Ch. 2, Article 29.2 The propaganda or agitation instigating social, racial, national or religious hatred and strife shall not be allowed. The propaganda of social, racial, national, religious or linguistic supremacy shall be banned. While their Constitution grants rights and freedoms otherwise, their inclusion may be limited by virtue of the following: Ch2.Article 55.3 The rights and freedoms of man and citizen may be limited by the federal law only to such an extent to which it is necessary for the protection of the fundamental principles of the constitutional system, morality, health, the rights and lawful interests of other people, for ensuring defense of the country and security of the State. An excerpt from The Constitution of the Russian Federation also displays how their government might also protect itself by way of excluding persons, even those born in their country, from the rights and freedoms of citizenship. Ch. 1, Article 6.1 The citizenship of the Russian Federation shall be acquired and terminated according to federal law, it shall be one and equal, irrespective of the grounds of acquisition. I wonder how the Russian government refers to its right to incarcerate persons that have been denied their citizenship. Perhaps those persons, that may be dissidents, have been placed in internment camps, migrated to another country or are no longer with us. With regard to protecting their government from grass roots political upheaval, China is no exception. The Constitution of the People's Republic of China states: Ch.1, Article 1 Disruption of the socialist system by any organization or individual is prohibited. Also, concerning China, their own Constitution didn't help protect the Uighurs in 2017-2018 when 1.2 million people n the Xingjiang province, because of their ethnicity, religion or political beliefs, were either displaced in internment camps, escaped or disappeared. Ch. 1, Article 4 The state protects the lawful rights and interests of the minority nationalities and upholds and develops a relationship of equality, unity and mutual assistance among all of China's nationalities. Discrimination against and oppression of any nationality are prohibited, any act which undermines the unity of the nationalities or instigates division is prohibited. Clearly the Chinese government wasn't bound by their own Constitution in this case. Could it be that the Chinese government does not bind itself by its own Constitution? Does its Constitution only pertain to its people? The Kingdom of Denmark, also protects their government within its own Constitution. 4.34 Any person who attacks its security or freedom, or any person who issues or obeys any command aiming thereat shall be deemed guilty of high treason. 7.67 ...The Citizens shall be entitled for form congregations for the worship of God...provided that nothing at variance with good morals or public order shall be taught or done. Note the contrast to our own Constitution. Freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, freedom of religion and other freedoms are simply stated, without confines or stipulations. Freedom? More than half the world's population is bound to be complacent with the workings of their government, who is also their provider, employer, etc., an entity much larger than themselves, that can claim civil unrest, upheaval or even treason as its own grievance for the purpose of quelling criticism or political challenge. The daily lives of billions who live in a style of economic bondage and political constraint are staid and silent. Freedoms that we enjoy are unknown to them. A different way of life that includes advancement, property ownership and political change is separate and far apart from their daily existence. One works at a job and goes home to an apartment, often cramped with the caring of elderly parents or disabled relatives, as is dictated by many socialist governments. This country is, without a doubt, the freest society on Earth. We revel in objection, in criticism, in change, and in our aspirations. Each of us lives with the hope that tomorrow or next year will bring a better lifestyle or continued fortune for ourselves and our children. Even political disagreements or upheaval is an effort on the part of all concerned towards whatever progress one might envision. Consider the difference of that vision from person to person or organization to organization. The net result is change and progress as many converge to convey their most important challenges of the day with the prevailing step forward having withstood the opposition. There are no bounds to what anyone can do with their lives in our society. There are few boundaries to what a person can own or achieve in our society. For ourselves and our children the sky is the limit. Imagine being without that. Imagine waking up one morning to discover that this country became socialist.
Let's Look at the Numbers Several striking comparisons among socialist countries verses the United States with regard to education, poverty, and employment have negated the argument that people in socialist countries are living in a society where the government dispenses and fosters a standard of living that even parallels with society in this country. Illiteracy is rampant in Sub-Saharan Africa, while many of the citizens of China, and the many countries stretching across Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Central and South East Asia, South America and Central America have, on average, have a modest level of education to the degree that the populace is denied their political voice or their ability to affect change within a socialist system. Germany is one exception with the average number of years of schooling in 2017 for its populace at 14.1, the highest average number of years of schooling of any country for the year. Also, for 2017 the United States and Switzerland tied for second place at 13.4 average years of schooling. Canada was third at 13.3, with Israel and Lithuania close behind measuring 13 average number of years of schooling for their populace. With FASFA funding more than tripled in 2019 with $322 available for 2020 and yearly increases going forward, expect more and more students in the US to be attending college in the years ahead. In other parts of the world, however, millions of people live with an elementary level of education or, in fact, without the capability of reading or writing. Challenging their country's political machine is far out of reach for the people of most socialist countries throughout the world. Those people live in a bondage of ignorance and poverty, with little hope for to improve the for themselves or their children. While we've heard from Congressman Welch in that countries all around the world are socialist and thus we should be socialist too, let's look more closely at the educational boundary that precludes people from improving the quality of their lives or affecting political change. In Southeast Asia, the average number of years of schooling for persons living in Cambodia is 4.8, Myanmar 4.8, Laos 5.2, in Asia- Pakistan 5.2, India 6.4, China 7.8, Bhutan 3, in Africa- Niger 2, Burundi 3, Guinea 2.6, Ethiopia 2.7, Gambia 3.5, Chad 2.3, Central African Republic 4.3, Niger 2, Rwanda 4.1, Liberia 4.7, Mozambique 3.5, Kenya 6.5, Djibouti 4.1, with many more countries having similar averages throughout the continent. The Middle East is no exception, Afghanistan 3.8, Bangladesh 5.8, Sudan 3.7, Syria 5.1, Yemen 3, Iraq 6.8, average years of schooling for 2017. Average number of years of education per country as well as illiteracy rates per region are presented in the charts to the right. Concerning employment, while many socialist countries tout the government as an entity that will find jobs for its people, not all people in socialist countries find jobs. Without entrepreneurship or inherited wealth available for the vast majority in most countries, many are unemployed and, as a matter of law, live with family members that can support them. When comparing the Employment Index numbers from the United States verses, for example, Russia that posted for the second quarter of 2020 an Employment Index of 70.2%, the numbers may be comparing apples to oranges. For the US, add in those receiving unemployment to discover the percent of the workforce with weekly pay. Also, include those who live off wealth or real estate income prior to retirement age. Those that are employed in Russia must house and provide for family members that are retired, disabled or without work, that cannot provide for themselves. In fact, many socialist countries call upon their workforce to provide for those family members that cannot cover their own expenses until the time of their employment and self subsistence or passing. Those in need without family members who can support them are provided with minimal subsistence by their government. Certainly poverty and unemployment exist throughout the world and accentuated by illiteracy and sub standard levels of educational success. In the United States, advanced by the monetary crisis of 2008, the poverty rate rose to a post 2000 peak of 15.1% in 2010 and declined on a near annual basis to 11.8% in 2018. The child poverty rate was 16.2% in 2018, also in decline since 2010. Keep in mind that other factors are a determinant in overall income, such as real estate and invested assets, such as the Pensioner Poverty Index doesn't count income from other sources. Also, some statistics are relative. The Poverty Rate chart to the right presents poverty, in this instance, as a level that is 60% less than the mean (average) income level for a given year. In looking at the numbers I would suggest that the United States is fairing near the top. In making that determination, I've factored in this country's mobility with regard to such things as poverty, child poverty and unemployment. Shifts in fiscal and monetary policy led to a notable rebound since 2010 shown in the above economic indicators. Mobility also exists in the workplace, where a private and public sector job market exists that enables persons to migrate to many categories of employment, training and careers. Higher education is available at any age, unlike many socialist countries, as well. In addition, persons are free to choose their area of study and school within college acceptance response. Also, keep in mind that people are able to start a business with little effort and typically minimal trade name registration cost. In the US, government approval doesn't include party loyalty, employment record, scholastic achievement or even criminal record. America, as a result, can move in terms of economic growth, technological advancement, income potential, and net worth of its citizens. The birth of the Internet is a striking example. New companies were born that made fortunes for investors while productivity soared. Other factors such as invested capital, real estate, pension combined with 401k, Employee Stock Option Purchasing- also entitlements, such as food stamps, fuel assistance in addition to social security make retirement far more advantageous for Americans than the Pensioner Poverty indicator suggests. My final point in rebuttal to the Democratic left is that while left wingers will point to the success of Germany or Switzerland a as good reason why this country should change the very nature of its fiber and become socialist, I point to the world as a clear indication that such a change would be to our vast detriment. Illiteracy, extreme poverty, people without electricity, also, people living around the world in a silent nightmare, without a political voice that can make for progress.
Statistic: The illiteracy rate among all adults (over 15-year-olds) in 2018* , by world region | Statista
Find more statistics at Statista
Statistic: Poverty rate in the United States from 1990 to 2018 | Statista
Find more statistics at Statista
Infographic: Where Global Poverty Is Rampant | Statista You will find more infographics at Statista
Infographic: Where Is Pensioner Poverty The Most Prevalent? | Statista You will find more infographics at Statista

How Free Are People Who Live in Socialist Countries?

How Free are the Citizens of Socialist Countries? In socialist countries, the federal government provides, health care, primary and secondary education, affordable housing and employment. The government is, very often, the employer, the landlord, the health care provider and educational instructor. Sound like a dream come true? No. While medical care practices are, by and large, uniform, choice of secondary course of study is generally limited to one or several choices based upon a student's performance on aptitude tests. Affordable housing refers to apartment dwellings that are typically modest and uniform. One's employment is based upon school performance, in the case of Russia performance during their mandatory two years of either civil or military service, and only one or several choices may be provided. Advancement opportunities may exist through the application process available at your local government administrator for employment. Entrepreneurship, to a degree, exists in many socialist countries. The process of opening a business generally includes approval by the corresponding government entity with regard to one's party loyalty, education and, in the case of Denmark, one's religion. Entrepreneurship, when permitted,, typically involves only a modest to moderate level of businesses activity. Outcry, criticism, legislative action designed to allow for substantial progress in socialist countries is, in many cases, non-existent. Why? Because to organize in political opposition to the existing framework of government is unconstitutional and highly illegal. Even to criticize in public is unconstitutional. Where? Quebec, Russia, China and Denmark, to name a few. Here's an excerpt from Quebec's Charter of Rights and Freedoms. 9.1 In exercising his fundamental freedoms and rights, a person shall maintain regard for.... state laicity, public order... In this respect, the scope of the freedoms and rights, and limits to their exercise, may be fixed by law. While the Constitution of the Russian Federation protects political freedom, there is also inherent in its framework, language that precludes persons from affecting political change. Article 13.5 The creation and activities of public associations whose aims and actions are aimed at a forced change of the fundamental principles of the constitutional system and at violating the integrity of the Russian Federation, at undermining its security, at setting up armed units, and at instigating social, racial, national and religious strife shall be prohibited. Also- Ch. 2, Article 29.2 The propaganda or agitation instigating social, racial, national or religious hatred and strife shall not be allowed. The propaganda of social, racial, national, religious or linguistic supremacy shall be banned. While their Constitution grants rights and freedoms otherwise, their inclusion may be limited by virtue of the following: Ch2.Article 55.3 The rights and freedoms of man and citizen may be limited by the federal law only to such an extent to which it is necessary for the protection of the fundamental principles of the constitutional system, morality, health, the rights and lawful interests of other people, for ensuring defense of the country and security of the State. An excerpt from The Constitution of the Russian Federation also displays how their government might also protect itself by way of excluding persons, even those born in their country, from the rights and freedoms of citizenship. Ch. 1, Article 6.1 The citizenship of the Russian Federation shall be acquired and terminated according to federal law, it shall be one and equal, irrespective of the grounds of acquisition. I wonder how the Russian government refers to its right to incarcerate persons that have been denied their citizenship. Perhaps those persons, that may be dissidents, have been placed in internment camps, migrated to another country or are no longer with us. With regard to protecting their government from grass roots political upheaval, China is no exception. The Constitution of the People's Republic of China states: Ch.1, Article 1 Disruption of the socialist system by any organization or individual is prohibited. Also, concerning China, their own Constitution didn't help protect the Uighurs in 2017-2018 when 1.2 million people n the Xingjiang province, because of their ethnicity, religion or political beliefs, were either displaced in internment camps, escaped or disappeared. Ch. 1, Article 4 The state protects the lawful rights and interests of the minority nationalities and upholds and develops a relationship of equality, unity and mutual assistance among all of China's nationalities. Discrimination against and oppression of any nationality are prohibited, any act which undermines the unity of the nationalities or instigates division is prohibited. Clearly the Chinese government wasn't bound by their own Constitution in this case. Could it be that the Chinese government does not bind itself by its own Constitution? Does its Constitution only pertain to its people? The Kingdom of Denmark, also protects their government within its own Constitution. 4.34 Any person who attacks its security or freedom, or any person who issues or obeys any command aiming thereat shall be deemed guilty of high treason. 7.67 ...The Citizens shall be entitled for form congregations for the worship of God...provided that nothing at variance with good morals or public order shall be taught or done. Note the contrast to our own Constitution. Freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, freedom of religion and other freedoms are simply stated, without confines or stipulations. Freedom? More than half the world's population is bound to be complacent with the workings of their government, who is also their provider, employer, etc., an entity much larger than themselves, that can claim civil unrest, upheaval or even treason as its own grievance for the purpose of quelling criticism or political challenge. The daily lives of billions who live in a style of economic bondage and political constraint are staid and silent. Freedoms that we enjoy are unknown to them. A different way of life that includes advancement, property ownership and political change is separate and far apart from their daily existence. One works at a job and goes home to an apartment, often cramped with the caring of elderly parents or disabled relatives, as is dictated by many socialist governments. This country is, without a doubt, the freest society on Earth. We revel in objection, in criticism, in change, and in our aspirations. Each of us lives with the hope that tomorrow or next year will bring a better lifestyle or continued fortune for ourselves and our children. Even political disagreements or upheaval is an effort on the part of all concerned towards whatever progress one might envision. Consider the difference of that vision from person to person or organization to organization. The net result is change and progress as many converge to convey their most important challenges of the day with the prevailing step forward having withstood the opposition. There are no bounds to what anyone can do with their lives in our society. There are few boundaries to what a person can own or achieve in our society. For ourselves and our children the sky is the limit. Imagine being without that. Imagine waking up one morning to discover that this country became socialist.
Let's Look at the Numbers Several striking comparisons among socialist countries verses the United States with regard to education, poverty, and employment have negated the argument that people in socialist countries are living in a society where the government dispenses and fosters a standard of living that even parallels with society in this country. Illiteracy is rampant in Sub-Saharan Africa, while many of the citizens of China, and the many countries stretching across Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Central and South East Asia, South America and Central America have, on average, have a modest level of education to the degree that the populace is denied their political voice or their ability to affect change within a socialist system. Germany is one exception with the average number of years of schooling in 2017 for its populace at 14.1, the highest average number of years of schooling of any country for the year. Also, for 2017 the United States and Switzerland tied for second place at 13.4 average years of schooling. Canada was third at 13.3, with Israel and Lithuania close behind measuring 13 average number of years of schooling for their populace. With FASFA funding more than tripled in 2019 with $322 available for 2020 and yearly increases going forward, expect more and more students in the US to be attending college in the years ahead. In other parts of the world, however, millions of people live with an elementary level of education or, in fact, without the capability of reading or writing. Challenging their country's political machine is far out of reach for the people of most socialist countries throughout the world. Those people live in a bondage of ignorance and poverty, with little hope for to improve the for themselves or their children. While we've heard from Congressman Welch in that countries all around the world are socialist and thus we should be socialist too, let's look more closely at the educational boundary that precludes people from improving the quality of their lives or affecting political change. In Southeast Asia, the average number of years of schooling for persons living in Cambodia is 4.8, Myanmar 4.8, Laos 5.2, in Asia- Pakistan 5.2, India 6.4, China 7.8, Bhutan 3, in Africa- Niger 2, Burundi 3, Guinea 2.6, Ethiopia 2.7, Gambia 3.5, Chad 2.3, Central African Republic 4.3, Niger 2, Rwanda 4.1, Liberia 4.7, Mozambique 3.5, Kenya 6.5, Djibouti 4.1, with many more countries having similar averages throughout the continent. The Middle East is no exception, Afghanistan 3.8, Bangladesh 5.8, Sudan 3.7, Syria 5.1, Yemen 3, Iraq 6.8, average years of schooling for 2017. Average number of years of education per country as well as illiteracy rates per region are presented in the charts to the right. Concerning employment, while many socialist countries tout the government as an entity that will find jobs for its people, not all people in socialist countries find jobs. Without entrepreneurship or inherited wealth available for the vast majority in most countries, many are unemployed and, as a matter of law, live with family members that can support them. When comparing the Employment Index numbers from the United States verses, for example, Russia that posted for the second quarter of 2020 an Employment Index of 70.2%, the numbers may be comparing apples to oranges. For the US, add in those receiving unemployment to discover the percent of the workforce with weekly pay. Also, include those who live off wealth or real estate income prior to retirement age. Those that are employed in Russia must house and provide for family members that are retired, disabled or without work, that cannot provide for themselves. In fact, many socialist countries call upon their workforce to provide for those family members that cannot cover their own expenses until the time of their employment and self subsistence or passing. Those in need without family members who can support them are provided with minimal subsistence by their government. Certainly poverty and unemployment exist throughout the world and accentuated by illiteracy and sub standard levels of educational success. In the United States, advanced by the monetary crisis of 2008, the poverty rate rose to a post 2000 peak of 15.1% in 2010 and declined on a near annual basis to 11.8% in 2018. The child poverty rate was 16.2% in 2018, also in decline since 2010. Keep in mind that other factors are a determinant in overall income, such as real estate and invested assets, such as the Pensioner Poverty Index doesn't count income from other sources. Also, some statistics are relative. The Poverty Rate chart to the right presents poverty, in this instance, as a level that is 60% less than the mean (average) income level for a given year. In looking at the numbers I would suggest that the United States is fairing near the top. In making that determination, I've factored in this country's mobility with regard to such things as poverty, child poverty and unemployment. Shifts in fiscal and monetary policy led to a notable rebound since 2010 shown in the above economic indicators. Mobility also exists in the workplace, where a private and public sector job market exists that enables persons to migrate to many categories of employment, training and careers. Higher education is available at any age, unlike many socialist countries, as well. In addition, persons are free to choose their area of study and school within college acceptance response. Also, keep in mind that people are able to start a business with little effort and typically minimal trade name registration cost. In the US, government approval doesn't include party loyalty, employment record, scholastic achievement or even criminal record. America, as a result, can move in terms of economic growth, technological advancement, income potential, and net worth of its citizens. The birth of the Internet is a striking example. New companies were born that made fortunes for investors while productivity soared. Other factors such as invested capital, real estate, pension combined with 401k, Employee Stock Option Purchasing- also entitlements, such as food stamps, fuel assistance in addition to social security make retirement far more advantageous for Americans than the Pensioner Poverty indicator suggests. My final point in rebuttal to the Democratic left is that while left wingers will point to the success of Germany or Switzerland a as good reason why this country should change the very nature of its fiber and become socialist, I point to the world as a clear indication that such a change would be to our vast detriment. Illiteracy, extreme poverty, people without electricity, also, people living around the world in a silent nightmare, without a political voice that can make for progress.
How Free are the Citizens of Socialist Countries? In socialist countries, the federal government provides, health care, primary and secondary education, affordable housing and employment. The government is, very often, the employer, the landlord, the health care provider and educational instructor. Sound like a dream come true? No. While medical care practices are, by and large, uniform, choice of secondary course of study is generally limited to one or several choices based upon a student's performance on aptitude tests. Affordable housing refers to apartment dwellings that are typically modest and uniform. One's employment is based upon school performance, in the case of Russia performance during their mandatory two years of either civil or military service, and only one or several choices may be provided. Advancement opportunities may exist through the application process available at your local government administrator for employment. Entrepreneurship, to a degree, exists in many socialist countries. The process of opening a business generally includes approval by the corresponding government entity with regard to one's party loyalty, education and, in the case of Denmark, one's religion. Entrepreneurship, when permitted,, typically involves only a modest to moderate level of businesses activity. Outcry, criticism, legislative action designed to allow for substantial progress in socialist countries is, in many cases, non-existent. Why? Because to organize in political opposition to the existing framework of government is unconstitutional and highly illegal. Even to criticize in public is unconstitutional. Where? Quebec, Russia, China and Denmark, to name a few. Here's an excerpt from Quebec's Charter of Rights and Freedoms. 9.1 In exercising his fundamental freedoms and rights, a person shall maintain regard for.... state laicity, public order... In this respect, the scope of the freedoms and rights, and limits to their exercise, may be fixed by law. While the Constitution of the Russian Federation protects political freedom, there is also inherent in its framework, language that precludes persons from affecting political change. Article 13.5 The creation and activities of public associations whose aims and actions are aimed at a forced change of the fundamental principles of the constitutional system and at violating the integrity of the Russian Federation, at undermining its security, at setting up armed units, and at instigating social, racial, national and religious strife shall be prohibited. Also- Ch. 2, Article 29.2 The propaganda or agitation instigating social, racial, national or religious hatred and strife shall not be allowed. The propaganda of social, racial, national, religious or linguistic supremacy shall be banned. While their Constitution grants rights and freedoms otherwise, their inclusion may be limited by virtue of the following: Ch2.Article 55.3 The rights and freedoms of man and citizen may be limited by the federal law only to such an extent to which it is necessary for the protection of the fundamental principles of the constitutional system, morality, health, the rights and lawful interests of other people, for ensuring defense of the country and security of the State. An excerpt from The Constitution of the Russian Federation also displays how their government might also protect itself by way of excluding persons, even those born in their country, from the rights and freedoms of citizenship. Ch. 1, Article 6.1 The citizenship of the Russian Federation shall be acquired and terminated according to federal law, it shall be one and equal, irrespective of the grounds of acquisition. I wonder how the Russian government refers to its right to incarcerate persons that have been denied their citizenship. Perhaps those persons, that may be dissidents, have been placed in internment camps, migrated to another country or are no longer with us. With regard to protecting their government from grass roots political upheaval, China is no exception. The Constitution of the People's Republic of China states: Ch.1, Article 1 Disruption of the socialist system by any organization or individual is prohibited. Also, concerning China, their own Constitution didn't help protect the Uighurs in 2017-2018 when 1.2 million people n the Xingjiang province, because of their ethnicity, religion or political beliefs, were either displaced in internment camps, escaped or disappeared. Ch. 1, Article 4 The state protects the lawful rights and interests of the minority nationalities and upholds and develops a relationship of equality, unity and mutual assistance among all of China's nationalities. Discrimination against and oppression of any nationality are prohibited, any act which undermines the unity of the nationalities or instigates division is prohibited. Clearly the Chinese government wasn't bound by their own Constitution in this case. Could it be that the Chinese government does not bind itself by its own Constitution? Does its Constitution only pertain to its people? The Kingdom of Denmark, also protects their government within its own Constitution. 4.34 Any person who attacks its security or freedom, or any person who issues or obeys any command aiming thereat shall be deemed guilty of high treason. 7.67 ...The Citizens shall be entitled for form congregations for the worship of God...provided that nothing at variance with good morals or public order shall be taught or done. Note the contrast to our own Constitution. Freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, freedom of religion and other freedoms are simply stated, without confines or stipulations. Freedom? More than half the world's population is bound to be complacent with the workings of their government, who is also their provider, employer, etc., an entity much larger than themselves, that can claim civil unrest, upheaval or even treason as its own grievance for the purpose of quelling criticism or political challenge. The daily lives of billions who live in a style of economic bondage and political constraint are staid and silent. Freedoms that we enjoy are unknown to them. A different way of life that includes advancement, property ownership and political change is separate and far apart from their daily existence. One works at a job and goes home to an apartment, often cramped with the caring of elderly parents or disabled relatives, as is dictated by many socialist governments. This country is, without a doubt, the freest society on Earth. We revel in objection, in criticism, in change, and in our aspirations. Each of us lives with the hope that tomorrow or next year will bring a better lifestyle or continued fortune for ourselves and our children. Even political disagreements or upheaval is an effort on the part of all concerned towards whatever progress one might envision. Consider the difference of that vision from person to person or organization to organization. The net result is change and progress as many converge to convey their most important challenges of the day with the prevailing step forward having withstood the opposition. There are no bounds to what anyone can do with their lives in our society. There are few boundaries to what a person can own or achieve in our society. For ourselves and our children the sky is the limit. Imagine being without that. Imagine waking up one morning to discover that this country became socialist.
Let's Look at the Numbers Several striking comparisons among socialist countries verses the United States with regard to education, poverty, and employment have negated the argument that people in socialist countries are living in a society where the government dispenses and fosters a standard of living that even parallels with society in this country. Illiteracy is rampant in Sub-Saharan Africa, while many of the citizens of China, and the many countries stretching across Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Central and South East Asia, South America and Central America have, on average, have a modest level of education to the degree that the populace is denied their political voice or their ability to affect change within a socialist system. Germany is one exception with the average number of years of schooling in 2017 for its populace at 14.1, the highest average number of years of schooling of any country for the year. Also, for 2017 the United States and Switzerland tied for second place at 13.4 average years of schooling. Canada was third at 13.3, with Israel and Lithuania close behind measuring 13 average number of years of schooling for their populace. With FASFA funding more than tripled in 2019 with $322 available for 2020 and yearly increases going forward, expect more and more students in the US to be attending college in the years ahead. In other parts of the world, however, millions of people live with an elementary level of education or, in fact, without the capability of reading or writing. Challenging their country's political machine is far out of reach for the people of most socialist countries throughout the world. Those people live in a bondage of ignorance and poverty, with little hope for to improve the for themselves or their children. While we've heard from Congressman Welch in that countries all around the world are socialist and thus we should be socialist too, let's look more closely at the educational boundary that precludes people from improving the quality of their lives or affecting political change. In Southeast Asia, the average number of years of schooling for persons living in Cambodia is 4.8, Myanmar 4.8, Laos 5.2, in Asia- Pakistan 5.2, India 6.4, China 7.8, Bhutan 3, in Africa- Niger 2, Burundi 3, Guinea 2.6, Ethiopia 2.7, Gambia 3.5, Chad 2.3, Central African Republic 4.3, Niger 2, Rwanda 4.1, Liberia 4.7, Mozambique 3.5, Kenya 6.5, Djibouti 4.1, with many more countries having similar averages throughout the continent. The Middle East is no exception, Afghanistan 3.8, Bangladesh 5.8, Sudan 3.7, Syria 5.1, Yemen 3, Iraq 6.8, average years of schooling for 2017. Average number of years of education per country as well as illiteracy rates per region are presented in the charts to the right. Concerning employment, while many socialist countries tout the government as an entity that will find jobs for its people, not all people in socialist countries find jobs. Without entrepreneurship or inherited wealth available for the vast majority in most countries, many are unemployed and, as a matter of law, live with family members that can support them. When comparing the Employment Index numbers from the United States verses, for example, Russia that posted for the second quarter of 2020 an Employment Index of 70.2%, the numbers may be comparing apples to oranges. For the US, add in those receiving unemployment to discover the percent of the workforce with weekly pay. Also, include those who live off wealth or real estate income prior to retirement age. Those that are employed in Russia must house and provide for family members that are retired, disabled or without work, that cannot provide for themselves. In fact, many socialist countries call upon their workforce to provide for those family members that cannot cover their own expenses until the time of their employment and self subsistence or passing. Those in need without family members who can support them are provided with minimal subsistence by their government. Certainly poverty and unemployment exist throughout the world and accentuated by illiteracy and sub standard levels of educational success. In the United States, advanced by the monetary crisis of 2008, the poverty rate rose to a post 2000 peak of 15.1% in 2010 and declined on a near annual basis to 11.8% in 2018. The child poverty rate was 16.2% in 2018, also in decline since 2010. Keep in mind that other factors are a determinant in overall income, such as real estate and invested assets, such as the Pensioner Poverty Index doesn't count income from other sources. Also, some statistics are relative. The Poverty Rate chart to the right presents poverty, in this instance, as a level that is 60% less than the mean (average) income level for a given year. In looking at the numbers I would suggest that the United States is fairing near the top. In making that determination, I've factored in this country's mobility with regard to such things as poverty, child poverty and unemployment. Shifts in fiscal and monetary policy led to a notable rebound since 2010 shown in the above economic indicators. Mobility also exists in the workplace, where a private and public sector job market exists that enables persons to migrate to many categories of employment, training and careers. Higher education is available at any age, unlike many socialist countries, as well. In addition, persons are free to choose their area of study and school within college acceptance response. Also, keep in mind that people are able to start a business with little effort and typically minimal trade name registration cost. In the US, government approval doesn't include party loyalty, employment record, scholastic achievement or even criminal record. America, as a result, can move in terms of economic growth, technological advancement, income potential, and net worth of its citizens. The birth of the Internet is a striking example. New companies were born that made fortunes for investors while productivity soared. Other factors such as invested capital, real estate, pension combined with 401k, Employee Stock Option Purchasing- also entitlements, such as food stamps, fuel assistance in addition to social security make retirement far more advantageous for Americans than the Pensioner Poverty indicator suggests. My final point in rebuttal to the Democratic left is that while left wingers will point to the success of Germany or Switzerland a as good reason why this country should change the very nature of its fiber and become socialist, I point to the world as a clear indication that such a change would be to our vast detriment. Illiteracy, extreme poverty, people without electricity, also, people living around the world in a silent nightmare, without a political voice that can make for progress.
How Free are the Citizens of Socialist Countries? In socialist countries, the federal government provides, health care, primary and secondary education, affordable housing and employment. The government is, very often, the employer, the landlord, the health care provider and educational instructor. Sound like a dream come true? No. While medical care practices are, by and large, uniform, choice of secondary course of study is generally limited to one or several choices based upon a student's performance on aptitude tests. Affordable housing refers to apartment dwellings that are typically modest and uniform. One's employment is based upon school performance, in the case of Russia performance during their mandatory two years of either civil or military service, and only one or several choices may be provided. Advancement opportunities may exist through the application process available at your local government administrator for employment. Entrepreneurship, to a degree, exists in many socialist countries. The process of opening a business generally includes approval by the corresponding government entity with regard to one's party loyalty, education and, in the case of Denmark, one's religion. Entrepreneurship, when permitted,, typically involves only a modest to moderate level of businesses activity. Outcry, criticism, legislative action designed to allow for substantial progress in socialist countries is, in many cases, non-existent. Why? Because to organize in political opposition to the existing framework of government is unconstitutional and highly illegal. Even to criticize in public is unconstitutional. Where? Quebec, Russia, China and Denmark, to name a few. Here's an excerpt from Quebec's Charter of Rights and Freedoms. 9.1 In exercising his fundamental freedoms and rights, a person shall maintain regard for.... state laicity, public order... In this respect, the scope of the freedoms and rights, and limits to their exercise, may be fixed by law. While the Constitution of the Russian Federation protects political freedom, there is also inherent in its framework, language that precludes persons from affecting political change. Article 13.5 The creation and activities of public associations whose aims and actions are aimed at a forced change of the fundamental principles of the constitutional system and at violating the integrity of the Russian Federation, at undermining its security, at setting up armed units, and at instigating social, racial, national and religious strife shall be prohibited. Also- Ch. 2, Article 29.2 The propaganda or agitation instigating social, racial, national or religious hatred and strife shall not be allowed. The propaganda of social, racial, national, religious or linguistic supremacy shall be banned. While their Constitution grants rights and freedoms otherwise, their inclusion may be limited by virtue of the following: Ch2.Article 55.3 The rights and freedoms of man and citizen may be limited by the federal law only to such an extent to which it is necessary for the protection of the fundamental principles of the constitutional system, morality, health, the rights and lawful interests of other people, for ensuring defense of the country and security of the State. An excerpt from The Constitution of the Russian Federation also displays how their government might also protect itself by way of excluding persons, even those born in their country, from the rights and freedoms of citizenship. Ch. 1, Article 6.1 The citizenship of the Russian Federation shall be acquired and terminated according to federal law, it shall be one and equal, irrespective of the grounds of acquisition. I wonder how the Russian government refers to its right to incarcerate persons that have been denied their citizenship. Perhaps those persons, that may be dissidents, have been placed in internment camps, migrated to another country or are no longer with us. With regard to protecting their government from grass roots political upheaval, China is no exception. The Constitution of the People's Republic of China states: Ch.1, Article 1 Disruption of the socialist system by any organization or individual is prohibited. Also, concerning China, their own Constitution didn't help protect the Uighurs in 2017-2018 when 1.2 million people n the Xingjiang province, because of their ethnicity, religion or political beliefs, were either displaced in internment camps, escaped or disappeared. Ch. 1, Article 4 The state protects the lawful rights and interests of the minority nationalities and upholds and develops a relationship of equality, unity and mutual assistance among all of China's nationalities. Discrimination against and oppression of any nationality are prohibited, any act which undermines the unity of the nationalities or instigates division is prohibited. Clearly the Chinese government wasn't bound by their own Constitution in this case. Could it be that the Chinese government does not bind itself by its own Constitution? Does its Constitution only pertain to its people? The Kingdom of Denmark, also protects their government within its own Constitution. 4.34 Any person who attacks its security or freedom, or any person who issues or obeys any command aiming thereat shall be deemed guilty of high treason. 7.67 ...The Citizens shall be entitled for form congregations for the worship of God...provided that nothing at variance with good morals or public order shall be taught or done. Note the contrast to our own Constitution. Freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, freedom of religion and other freedoms are simply stated, without confines or stipulations. Freedom? More than half the world's population is bound to be complacent with the workings of their government, who is also their provider, employer, etc., an entity much larger than themselves, that can claim civil unrest, upheaval or even treason as its own grievance for the purpose of quelling criticism or political challenge. The daily lives of billions who live in a style of economic bondage and political constraint are staid and silent. Freedoms that we enjoy are unknown to them. A different way of life that includes advancement, property ownership and political change is separate and far apart from their daily existence. One works at a job and goes home to an apartment, often cramped with the caring of elderly parents or disabled relatives, as is dictated by many socialist governments. This country is, without a doubt, the freest society on Earth. We revel in objection, in criticism, in change, and in our aspirations. Each of us lives with the hope that tomorrow or next year will bring a better lifestyle or continued fortune for ourselves and our children. Even political disagreements or upheaval is an effort on the part of all concerned towards whatever progress one might envision. Consider the difference of that vision from person to person or organization to organization. The net result is change and progress as many converge to convey their most important challenges of the day with the prevailing step forward having withstood the opposition. There are no bounds to what anyone can do with their lives in our society. There are few boundaries to what a person can own or achieve in our society. For ourselves and our children the sky is the limit. Imagine being without that. Imagine waking up one morning to discover that this country became socialist.
Let's Look at the Numbers Several striking comparisons among socialist countries verses the United States with regard to education, poverty, and employment have negated the argument that people in socialist countries are living in a society where the government dispenses and fosters a standard of living that even parallels with society in this country. Illiteracy is rampant in Sub-Saharan Africa, while many of the citizens of China, and the many countries stretching across Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Central and South East Asia, South America and Central America have, on average, have a modest level of education to the degree that the populace is denied their political voice or their ability to affect change within a socialist system. Germany is one exception with the average number of years of schooling in 2017 for its populace at 14.1, the highest average number of years of schooling of any country for the year. Also, for 2017 the United States and Switzerland tied for second place at 13.4 average years of schooling. Canada was third at 13.3, with Israel and Lithuania close behind measuring 13 average number of years of schooling for their populace. With FASFA funding more than tripled in 2019 with $322 available for 2020 and yearly increases going forward, expect more and more students in the US to be attending college in the years ahead. In other parts of the world, however, millions of people live with an elementary level of education or, in fact, without the capability of reading or writing. Challenging their country's political machine is far out of reach for the people of most socialist countries throughout the world. Those people live in a bondage of ignorance and poverty, with little hope for to improve the for themselves or their children. While we've heard from Congressman Welch in that countries all around the world are socialist and thus we should be socialist too, let's look more closely at the educational boundary that precludes people from improving the quality of their lives or affecting political change. In Southeast Asia, the average number of years of schooling for persons living in Cambodia is 4.8, Myanmar 4.8, Laos 5.2, in Asia- Pakistan 5.2, India 6.4, China 7.8, Bhutan 3, in Africa- Niger 2, Burundi 3, Guinea 2.6, Ethiopia 2.7, Gambia 3.5, Chad 2.3, Central African Republic 4.3, Niger 2, Rwanda 4.1, Liberia 4.7, Mozambique 3.5, Kenya 6.5, Djibouti 4.1, with many more countries having similar averages throughout the continent. The Middle East is no exception, Afghanistan 3.8, Bangladesh 5.8, Sudan 3.7, Syria 5.1, Yemen 3, Iraq 6.8, average years of schooling for 2017. Average number of years of education per country as well as illiteracy rates per region are presented in the charts to the right. Concerning employment, while many socialist countries tout the government as an entity that will find jobs for its people, not all people in socialist countries find jobs. Without entrepreneurship or inherited wealth available for the vast majority in most countries, many are unemployed and, as a matter of law, live with family members that can support them. When comparing the Employment Index numbers from the United States verses, for example, Russia that posted for the second quarter of 2020 an Employment Index of 70.2%, the numbers may be comparing apples to oranges. For the US, add in those receiving unemployment to discover the percent of the workforce with weekly pay. Also, include those who live off wealth or real estate income prior to retirement age. Those that are employed in Russia must house and provide for family members that are retired, disabled or without work, that cannot provide for themselves. In fact, many socialist countries call upon their workforce to provide for those family members that cannot cover their own expenses until the time of their employment and self subsistence or passing. Those in need without family members who can support them are provided with minimal subsistence by their government. Certainly poverty and unemployment exist throughout the world and accentuated by illiteracy and sub standard levels of educational success. In the United States, advanced by the monetary crisis of 2008, the poverty rate rose to a post 2000 peak of 15.1% in 2010 and declined on a near annual basis to 11.8% in 2018. The child poverty rate was 16.2% in 2018, also in decline since 2010. Keep in mind that other factors are a determinant in overall income, such as real estate and invested assets, such as the Pensioner Poverty Index doesn't count income from other sources. Also, some statistics are relative. The Poverty Rate chart to the right presents poverty, in this instance, as a level that is 60% less than the mean (average) income level for a given year. In looking at the numbers I would suggest that the United States is fairing near the top. In making that determination, I've factored in this country's mobility with regard to such things as poverty, child poverty and unemployment. Shifts in fiscal and monetary policy led to a notable rebound since 2010 shown in the above economic indicators. Mobility also exists in the workplace, where a private and public sector job market exists that enables persons to migrate to many categories of employment, training and careers. Higher education is available at any age, unlike many socialist countries, as well. In addition, persons are free to choose their area of study and school within college acceptance response. Also, keep in mind that people are able to start a business with little effort and typically minimal trade name registration cost. In the US, government approval doesn't include party loyalty, employment record, scholastic achievement or even criminal record. America, as a result, can move in terms of economic growth, technological advancement, income potential, and net worth of its citizens. The birth of the Internet is a striking example. New companies were born that made fortunes for investors while productivity soared. Other factors such as invested capital, real estate, pension combined with 401k, Employee Stock Option Purchasing- also entitlements, such as food stamps, fuel assistance in addition to social security make retirement far more advantageous for Americans than the Pensioner Poverty indicator suggests. My final point in rebuttal to the Democratic left is that while left wingers will point to the success of Germany or Switzerland a as good reason why this country should change the very nature of its fiber and become socialist, I point to the world as a clear indication that such a change would be to our vast detriment. Illiteracy, extreme poverty, people without electricity, also, people living around the world in a silent nightmare, without a political voice that can make for progress.
How Free are the Citizens of Socialist Countries? In socialist countries, the federal government provides, health care, primary and secondary education, affordable housing and employment. The government is, very often, the employer, the landlord, the health care provider and educational instructor. Sound like a dream come true? No. While medical care practices are, by and large, uniform, choice of secondary course of study is generally limited to one or several choices based upon a student's performance on aptitude tests. Affordable housing refers to apartment dwellings that are typically modest and uniform. One's employment is based upon school performance, in the case of Russia performance during their mandatory two years of either civil or military service, and only one or several choices may be provided. Advancement opportunities may exist through the application process available at your local government administrator for employment. Entrepreneurship, to a degree, exists in many socialist countries. The process of opening a business generally includes approval by the corresponding government entity with regard to one's party loyalty, education and, in the case of Denmark, one's religion. Entrepreneurship, when permitted,, typically involves only a modest to moderate level of businesses activity. Outcry, criticism, legislative action designed to allow for substantial progress in socialist countries is, in many cases, non-existent. Why? Because to organize in political opposition to the existing framework of government is unconstitutional and highly illegal. Even to criticize in public is unconstitutional. Where? Quebec, Russia, China and Denmark, to name a few. Here's an excerpt from Quebec's Charter of Rights and Freedoms. 9.1 In exercising his fundamental freedoms and rights, a person shall maintain regard for.... state laicity, public order... In this respect, the scope of the freedoms and rights, and limits to their exercise, may be fixed by law. While the Constitution of the Russian Federation protects political freedom, there is also inherent in its framework, language that precludes persons from affecting political change. Article 13.5 The creation and activities of public associations whose aims and actions are aimed at a forced change of the fundamental principles of the constitutional system and at violating the integrity of the Russian Federation, at undermining its security, at setting up armed units, and at instigating social, racial, national and religious strife shall be prohibited. Also- Ch. 2, Article 29.2 The propaganda or agitation instigating social, racial, national or religious hatred and strife shall not be allowed. The propaganda of social, racial, national, religious or linguistic supremacy shall be banned. While their Constitution grants rights and freedoms otherwise, their inclusion may be limited by virtue of the following: Ch2.Article 55.3 The rights and freedoms of man and citizen may be limited by the federal law only to such an extent to which it is necessary for the protection of the fundamental principles of the constitutional system, morality, health, the rights and lawful interests of other people, for ensuring defense of the country and security of the State. An excerpt from The Constitution of the Russian Federation also displays how their government might also protect itself by way of excluding persons, even those born in their country, from the rights and freedoms of citizenship. Ch. 1, Article 6.1 The citizenship of the Russian Federation shall be acquired and terminated according to federal law, it shall be one and equal, irrespective of the grounds of acquisition. I wonder how the Russian government refers to its right to incarcerate persons that have been denied their citizenship. Perhaps those persons, that may be dissidents, have been placed in internment camps, migrated to another country or are no longer with us. With regard to protecting their government from grass roots political upheaval, China is no exception. The Constitution of the People's Republic of China states: Ch.1, Article 1 Disruption of the socialist system by any organization or individual is prohibited. Also, concerning China, their own Constitution didn't help protect the Uighurs in 2017-2018 when 1.2 million people n the Xingjiang province, because of their ethnicity, religion or political beliefs, were either displaced in internment camps, escaped or disappeared. Ch. 1, Article 4 The state protects the lawful rights and interests of the minority nationalities and upholds and develops a relationship of equality, unity and mutual assistance among all of China's nationalities. Discrimination against and oppression of any nationality are prohibited, any act which undermines the unity of the nationalities or instigates division is prohibited. Clearly the Chinese government wasn't bound by their own Constitution in this case. Could it be that the Chinese government does not bind itself by its own Constitution? Does its Constitution only pertain to its people? The Kingdom of Denmark, also protects their government within its own Constitution. 4.34 Any person who attacks its security or freedom, or any person who issues or obeys any command aiming thereat shall be deemed guilty of high treason. 7.67 ...The Citizens shall be entitled for form congregations for the worship of God...provided that nothing at variance with good morals or public order shall be taught or done. Note the contrast to our own Constitution. Freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, freedom of religion and other freedoms are simply stated, without confines or stipulations. Freedom? More than half the world's population is bound to be complacent with the workings of their government, who is also their provider, employer, etc., an entity much larger than themselves, that can claim civil unrest, upheaval or even treason as its own grievance for the purpose of quelling criticism or political challenge. The daily lives of billions who live in a style of economic bondage and political constraint are staid and silent. Freedoms that we enjoy are unknown to them. A different way of life that includes advancement, property ownership and political change is separate and far apart from their daily existence. One works at a job and goes home to an apartment, often cramped with the caring of elderly parents or disabled relatives, as is dictated by many socialist governments. This country is, without a doubt, the freest society on Earth. We revel in objection, in criticism, in change, and in our aspirations. Each of us lives with the hope that tomorrow or next year will bring a better lifestyle or continued fortune for ourselves and our children. Even political disagreements or upheaval is an effort on the part of all concerned towards whatever progress one might envision. Consider the difference of that vision from person to person or organization to organization. The net result is change and progress as many converge to convey their most important challenges of the day with the prevailing step forward having withstood the opposition. There are no bounds to what anyone can do with their lives in our society. There are few boundaries to what a person can own or achieve in our society. For ourselves and our children the sky is the limit. Imagine being without that. Imagine waking up one morning to discover that this country became socialist.
Let's Look at the Numbers Several striking comparisons among socialist countries verses the United States with regard to education, poverty, and employment have negated the argument that people in socialist countries are living in a society where the government dispenses and fosters a standard of living that even parallels with society in this country. Illiteracy is rampant in Sub-Saharan Africa, while many of the citizens of China, and the many countries stretching across Eastern Europe, the Middle East, Central and South East Asia, South America and Central America have, on average, have a modest level of education to the degree that the populace is denied their political voice or their ability to affect change within a socialist system. Germany is one exception with the average number of years of schooling in 2017 for its populace at 14.1, the highest average number of years of schooling of any country for the year. Also, for 2017 the United States and Switzerland tied for second place at 13.4 average years of schooling. Canada was third at 13.3, with Israel and Lithuania close behind measuring 13 average number of years of schooling for their populace. With FASFA funding more than tripled in 2019 with $322 available for 2020 and yearly increases going forward, expect more and more students in the US to be attending college in the years ahead. In other parts of the world, however, millions of people live with an elementary level of education or, in fact, without the capability of reading or writing. Challenging their country's political machine is far out of reach for the people of most socialist countries throughout the world. Those people live in a bondage of ignorance and poverty, with little hope for to improve the for themselves or their children. While we've heard from Congressman Welch in that countries all around the world are socialist and thus we should be socialist too, let's look more closely at the educational boundary that precludes people from improving the quality of their lives or affecting political change. In Southeast Asia, the average number of years of schooling for persons living in Cambodia is 4.8, Myanmar 4.8, Laos 5.2, in Asia- Pakistan 5.2, India 6.4, China 7.8, Bhutan 3, in Africa- Niger 2, Burundi 3, Guinea 2.6, Ethiopia 2.7, Gambia 3.5, Chad 2.3, Central African Republic 4.3, Niger 2, Rwanda 4.1, Liberia 4.7, Mozambique 3.5, Kenya 6.5, Djibouti 4.1, with many more countries having similar averages throughout the continent. The Middle East is no exception, Afghanistan 3.8, Bangladesh 5.8, Sudan 3.7, Syria 5.1, Yemen 3, Iraq 6.8, average years of schooling for 2017. Average number of years of education per country as well as illiteracy rates per region are presented in the charts to the right. Concerning employment, while many socialist countries tout the government as an entity that will find jobs for its people, not all people in socialist countries find jobs. Without entrepreneurship or inherited wealth available for the vast majority in most countries, many are unemployed and, as a matter of law, live with family members that can support them. When comparing the Employment Index numbers from the United States verses, for example, Russia that posted for the second quarter of 2020 an Employment Index of 70.2%, the numbers may be comparing apples to oranges. For the US, add in those receiving unemployment to discover the percent of the workforce with weekly pay. Also, include those who live off wealth or real estate income prior to retirement age. Those that are employed in Russia must house and provide for family members that are retired, disabled or without work, that cannot provide for themselves. In fact, many socialist countries call upon their workforce to provide for those family members that cannot cover their own expenses until the time of their employment and self subsistence or passing. Those in need without family members who can support them are provided with minimal subsistence by their government. Certainly poverty and unemployment exist throughout the world and accentuated by illiteracy and sub standard levels of educational success. In the United States, advanced by the monetary crisis of 2008, the poverty rate rose to a post 2000 peak of 15.1% in 2010 and declined on a near annual basis to 11.8% in 2018. The child poverty rate was 16.2% in 2018, also in decline since 2010. Keep in mind that other factors are a determinant in overall income, such as real estate and invested assets, such as the Pensioner Poverty Index doesn't count income from other sources. Also, some statistics are relative. The Poverty Rate chart to the right presents poverty, in this instance, as a level that is 60% less than the mean (average) income level for a given year. In looking at the numbers I would suggest that the United States is fairing near the top. In making that determination, I've factored in this country's mobility with regard to such things as poverty, child poverty and unemployment. Shifts in fiscal and monetary policy led to a notable rebound since 2010 shown in the above economic indicators. Mobility also exists in the workplace, where a private and public sector job market exists that enables persons to migrate to many categories of employment, training and careers. Higher education is available at any age, unlike many socialist countries, as well. In addition, persons are free to choose their area of study and school within college acceptance response. Also, keep in mind that people are able to start a business with little effort and typically minimal trade name registration cost. In the US, government approval doesn't include party loyalty, employment record, scholastic achievement or even criminal record. America, as a result, can move in terms of economic growth, technological advancement, income potential, and net worth of its citizens. The birth of the Internet is a striking example. New companies were born that made fortunes for investors while productivity soared. Other factors such as invested capital, real estate, pension combined with 401k, Employee Stock Option Purchasing- also entitlements, such as food stamps, fuel assistance in addition to social security make retirement far more advantageous for Americans than the Pensioner Poverty indicator suggests. My final point in rebuttal to the Democratic left is that while left wingers will point to the success of Germany or Switzerland a as good reason why this country should change the very nature of its fiber and become socialist, I point to the world as a clear indication that such a change would be to our vast detriment. Illiteracy, extreme poverty, people without electricity, also, people living around the world in a silent nightmare, without a political voice that can make for progress.