Last week, as I reviewed racism in medical care in the United States, I found numerous accounts of black Americans who were treated with racial bias when seeking medical care. One woman, when seeking medical care as a result of an IUD that had slipped and was causing severe discomfort, had to go home and remove it herself. Many individual experiences of black Americans are now reaching the media and people across this country with the help of the Internet and social media. However, black Americans have been subjected to racism with regard to their health care in the United States for some time. One study, by the Institute of Medicine, dates back to 2005 and was recently in a report presented by the American Bar Association. "... one study of 400 hospitals in the United States showed that black patients with heart disease received older, cheaper, and more conservative treatments than their white counterparts. Black patients were less likely to receive coronary bypass operations and angiography. After surgery, they are discharged earlier from the hospital than white patients—at a stage when discharge is inappropriate" ABA: "Implicit Bias and Racial Disparities in Health Care". The above article refutes the claim that black people have a lower life expectancy than that of white people as a result of other disparities, such as poverty, income level, housing conditions and education. The simple fact is that medical care practitioners proceed, on occasion, within the context of their own bias that may include a direct or indirect reference to racial differences.
Statistic: Median household income in the United States in 2019, by race or ethnic group (in U.S. dollars) | Statista
Find more statistics at Statista
The difference in the infant mortality rate among racial groups provides a striking comparison that tells a story without words. In 2017, infant mortality for white mothers was 4.67%, compared to 10.97% of infants born to black mothers. Children born to American and Alaskan Indian mothers had a mortality rate of 9.21 for the same year, compared to 3.78% of children born to Asian mothers and 5.1% born to Hispanic mothers. The infant mortality rate for children born to white mothers verses black mothers or American and Alaskan Indian mothers doubles. Why? The difference in the quality of pre-natal and post natal health care may certainly be the answer.

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Statistic: Infant mortality rate in the United States in 2017, by ethnicity of mother | Statista
Find more statistics at Statista
Native American and Alaskan Indian tribes are, in fact, guaranteed health care in perpetuity by virtue of many treaties that exchange health care for access to lands that comprise a portion of the United States. However, Native American and Alaskan Indians, though the federal government provides health care to them all, are confronting their own health care crisis. Infant mortality is just a part of this awful picture. Native American and Alaskan Indians live, on average six years less than the remainder of the country, about 72.4 years. Black Americans, at least are living longer than Native Americans and Alaskan Indians, with an average life span of 74.9 years. However, left wing Democrats and socialists would guarantee black Americans and the rest of the country, much in the same way that Native Americans and Alaskan Indians are covered. Honestly, the statistics show that universal health care, extending to all person the coverage now afforded to Native and Alaskan Indians, who are reaching their own critical conclusion- would extend the inadequacies and disparities found in their health care coverage to black Americans and the rest of the country. No- that's not the answer. Let's do this. 1. Amend the Civil Rights Amendment to include medical care. Including medical care would protect black Americans AND Native American and Alaskan Indians from maltreatment, malfeasance and racial bias wherever it may exist with regard to their medical care. Discrimination is against the law. Courts, in their disbursement of awards to victims of racism, tend to be generous, while the threat of legal liability on the part of landlords, lenders, employers, etc, created a level of professional standard throughout our society that extracted racism and racial bias from its repertoire. We can easily add medical care to that framework of legal protection. In doing so, we will be making a stride forward in the name of equality that will dispel decades of abuse and neglect, lead to improvements in infant mortality and life expectancy, and the quality of life for millions of Americans. We'll also be able to put to rest, with regards to medical care, our own malfeasance in allowing such human subjugation and degradation to have occurred.

Racism in Health Care in the US

USA Today: 12 charts show how racial disparities persist across wealth, health, education and beyond, June 18, 2020 American Bar Association: Implicit Bias and Racial Disparities in Health Care National Congress of American Indians: Health Care
 Last week, as I reviewed racism in medical care in the United States, I found numerous accounts of black Americans who were treated with racial bias when seeking medical care. One woman, when seeking medical care as a result of an IUD that had slipped and was causing severe discomfort, had to go home and remove it herself. Many individual experiences of black Americans are now reaching the media and people across this country with the help of the Internet and social media. However, black Americans have been subjected to racism with regard to their health care in the United States for some time. One study, by the Institute of Medicine, dates back to 2005 and was recently in a report presented by the American Bar Association. "... one study of 400 hospitals in the United States showed that black patients with heart disease received older, cheaper, and more conservative treatments than their white counterparts. Black patients were less likely to receive coronary bypass operations and angiography. After surgery, they are discharged earlier from the hospital than white patients—at a stage when discharge is inappropriate" ABA: "Implicit Bias and Racial Disparities in Health Care". The above article refutes the claim that black people have a lower life expectancy than that of white people as a result of other disparities, such as poverty, income level, housing conditions and education. The simple fact is that medical care practitioners proceed, on occasion, within the context of their own bias that may include a direct or indirect reference to racial differences. The difference in the infant mortality rate among racial groups provides a striking comparison that tells a story without words. In 2017, infant mortality for white mothers was 4.67%, compared to 10.97% of infants born to black mothers. Children born to American and Alaskan Indian mothers had a mortality rate of 9.21 for the same year, compared to 3.78% of children born to Asian mothers and 5.1% born to Hispanic mothers. The infant mortality rate for children born to white mothers verses black mothers or American and Alaskan Indian mothers doubles. Why? The difference in the quality of pre-natal and post natal health care may certainly be the answer.
Native American and Alaskan Indian tribes are, in fact, guaranteed health care in perpetuity by virtue of many treaties that exchange health care for access to lands that comprise a portion of the United States. However, Native American and Alaskan Indians, though the federal government provides health care to them all, are confronting their own health care crisis. Infant mortality is just a part of this awful picture. Native American and Alaskan Indians live, on average six years less than the remainder of the country, about 72.4 years. Black Americans, at least are living longer than Native Americans and Alaskan Indians, with an average life span of 74.9 years. However, left wing Democrats and socialists would guarantee black Americans and the rest of the country, much in the same way that Native Americans and Alaskan Indians are covered. Honestly, the statistics show that universal health care, extending to all person the coverage now afforded to Native and Alaskan Indians, who are reaching their own critical conclusion- would extend the inadequacies and disparities found in their health care coverage to black Americans and the rest of the country. No- that's not the answer. Let's do this. 1. Amend the Civil Rights Amendment to include medical care. Including medical care would protect black Americans AND Native American and Alaskan Indians from maltreatment, malfeasance and racial bias wherever it may exist with regard to their medical care. Discrimination is against the law. Courts, in their disbursement of awards to victims of racism, tend to be generous, while the threat of legal liability on the part of landlords, lenders, employers, etc, created a level of professional standard throughout our society that extracted racism and racial bias from its repertoire. We can easily add medical care to that framework of legal protection. In doing so, we will be making a stride forward in the name of equality that will dispel decades of abuse and neglect, lead to improvements in infant mortality and life expectancy, and the quality of life for millions of Americans. We'll also be able to put to rest, with regards to medical care, our own malfeasance in allowing such human subjugation and degradation to have occurred.
 Last week, as I reviewed racism in medical care in the United States, I found numerous accounts of black Americans who were treated with racial bias when seeking medical care. One woman, when seeking medical care as a result of an IUD that had slipped and was causing severe discomfort, had to go home and remove it herself. Many individual experiences of black Americans are now reaching the media and people across this country with the help of the Internet and social media. However, black Americans have been subjected to racism with regard to their health care in the United States for some time. One study, by the Institute of Medicine, dates back to 2005 and was recently in a report presented by the American Bar Association. "... one study of 400 hospitals in the United States showed that black patients with heart disease received older, cheaper, and more conservative treatments than their white counterparts. Black patients were less likely to receive coronary bypass operations and angiography. After surgery, they are discharged earlier from the hospital than white patients—at a stage when discharge is inappropriate" ABA: "Implicit Bias and Racial Disparities in Health Care". The above article refutes the claim that black people have a lower life expectancy than that of white people as a result of other disparities, such as poverty, income level, housing conditions and education. The simple fact is that medical care practitioners proceed, on occasion, within the context of their own bias that may include a direct or indirect reference to racial differences. The difference in the infant mortality rate among racial groups provides a striking comparison that tells a story without words. In 2017, infant mortality for white mothers was 4.67%, compared to 10.97% of infants born to black mothers. Children born to American and Alaskan Indian mothers had a mortality rate of 9.21 for the same year, compared to 3.78% of children born to Asian mothers and 5.1% born to Hispanic mothers. The infant mortality rate for children born to white mothers verses black mothers or American and Alaskan Indian mothers doubles. Why? The difference in the quality of pre-natal and post natal health care may certainly be the answer.
Native American and Alaskan Indian tribes are, in fact, guaranteed health care in perpetuity by virtue of many treaties that exchange health care for access to lands that comprise a portion of the United States. However, Native American and Alaskan Indians, though the federal government provides health care to them all, are confronting their own health care crisis. Infant mortality is just a part of this awful picture. Native American and Alaskan Indians live, on average six years less than the remainder of the country, about 72.4 years. Black Americans, at least are living longer than Native Americans and Alaskan Indians, with an average life span of 74.9 years. However, left wing Democrats and socialists would guarantee black Americans and the rest of the country, much in the same way that Native Americans and Alaskan Indians are covered. Honestly, the statistics show that universal health care, extending to all person the coverage now afforded to Native and Alaskan Indians, who are reaching their own critical conclusion- would extend the inadequacies and disparities found in their health care coverage to black Americans and the rest of the country. No- that's not the answer. Let's do this. 1. Amend the Civil Rights Amendment to include medical care. Including medical care would protect black Americans AND Native American and Alaskan Indians from maltreatment, malfeasance and racial bias wherever it may exist with regard to their medical care. Discrimination is against the law. Courts, in their disbursement of awards to victims of racism, tend to be generous, while the threat of legal liability on the part of landlords, lenders, employers, etc, created a level of professional standard throughout our society that extracted racism and racial bias from its repertoire. We can easily add medical care to that framework of legal protection. In doing so, we will be making a stride forward in the name of equality that will dispel decades of abuse and neglect, lead to improvements in infant mortality and life expectancy, and the quality of life for millions of Americans. We'll also be able to put to rest, with regards to medical care, our own malfeasance in allowing such human subjugation and degradation to have occurred.
 Last week, as I reviewed racism in medical care in the United States, I found numerous accounts of black Americans who were treated with racial bias when seeking medical care. One woman, when seeking medical care as a result of an IUD that had slipped and was causing severe discomfort, had to go home and remove it herself. Many individual experiences of black Americans are now reaching the media and people across this country with the help of the Internet and social media. However, black Americans have been subjected to racism with regard to their health care in the United States for some time. One study, by the Institute of Medicine, dates back to 2005 and was recently in a report presented by the American Bar Association. "... one study of 400 hospitals in the United States showed that black patients with heart disease received older, cheaper, and more conservative treatments than their white counterparts. Black patients were less likely to receive coronary bypass operations and angiography. After surgery, they are discharged earlier from the hospital than white patients—at a stage when discharge is inappropriate" ABA: "Implicit Bias and Racial Disparities in Health Care". The above article refutes the claim that black people have a lower life expectancy than that of white people as a result of other disparities, such as poverty, income level, housing conditions and education. The simple fact is that medical care practitioners proceed, on occasion, within the context of their own bias that may include a direct or indirect reference to racial differences. The difference in the infant mortality rate among racial groups provides a striking comparison that tells a story without words. In 2017, infant mortality for white mothers was 4.67%, compared to 10.97% of infants born to black mothers. Children born to American and Alaskan Indian mothers had a mortality rate of 9.21 for the same year, compared to 3.78% of children born to Asian mothers and 5.1% born to Hispanic mothers. The infant mortality rate for children born to white mothers verses black mothers or American and Alaskan Indian mothers doubles. Why? The difference in the quality of pre-natal and post natal health care may certainly be the answer.
Native American and Alaskan Indian tribes are, in fact, guaranteed health care in perpetuity by virtue of many treaties that exchange health care for access to lands that comprise a portion of the United States. However, Native American and Alaskan Indians, though the federal government provides health care to them all, are confronting their own health care crisis. Infant mortality is just a part of this awful picture. Native American and Alaskan Indians live, on average six years less than the remainder of the country, about 72.4 years. Black Americans, at least are living longer than Native Americans and Alaskan Indians, with an average life span of 74.9 years. However, left wing Democrats and socialists would guarantee black Americans and the rest of the country, much in the same way that Native Americans and Alaskan Indians are covered. Honestly, the statistics show that universal health care, extending to all person the coverage now afforded to Native and Alaskan Indians, who are reaching their own critical conclusion- would extend the inadequacies and disparities found in their health care coverage to black Americans and the rest of the country. No- that's not the answer. Let's do this. 1. Amend the Civil Rights Amendment to include medical care. Including medical care would protect black Americans AND Native American and Alaskan Indians from maltreatment, malfeasance and racial bias wherever it may exist with regard to their medical care. Discrimination is against the law. Courts, in their disbursement of awards to victims of racism, tend to be generous, while the threat of legal liability on the part of landlords, lenders, employers, etc, created a level of professional standard throughout our society that extracted racism and racial bias from its repertoire. We can easily add medical care to that framework of legal protection. In doing so, we will be making a stride forward in the name of equality that will dispel decades of abuse and neglect, lead to improvements in infant mortality and life expectancy, and the quality of life for millions of Americans. We'll also be able to put to rest, with regards to medical care, our own malfeasance in allowing such human subjugation and degradation to have occurred.
 Last week, as I reviewed racism in medical care in the United States, I found numerous accounts of black Americans who were treated with racial bias when seeking medical care. One woman, when seeking medical care as a result of an IUD that had slipped and was causing severe discomfort, had to go home and remove it herself. Many individual experiences of black Americans are now reaching the media and people across this country with the help of the Internet and social media. However, black Americans have been subjected to racism with regard to their health care in the United States for some time. One study, by the Institute of Medicine, dates back to 2005 and was recently in a report presented by the American Bar Association. "... one study of 400 hospitals in the United States showed that black patients with heart disease received older, cheaper, and more conservative treatments than their white counterparts. Black patients were less likely to receive coronary bypass operations and angiography. After surgery, they are discharged earlier from the hospital than white patients—at a stage when discharge is inappropriate" ABA: "Implicit Bias and Racial Disparities in Health Care". The above article refutes the claim that black people have a lower life expectancy than that of white people as a result of other disparities, such as poverty, income level, housing conditions and education. The simple fact is that medical care practitioners proceed, on occasion, within the context of their own bias that may include a direct or indirect reference to racial differences. The difference in the infant mortality rate among racial groups provides a striking comparison that tells a story without words. In 2017, infant mortality for white mothers was 4.67%, compared to 10.97% of infants born to black mothers. Children born to American and Alaskan Indian mothers had a mortality rate of 9.21 for the same year, compared to 3.78% of children born to Asian mothers and 5.1% born to Hispanic mothers. The infant mortality rate for children born to white mothers verses black mothers or American and Alaskan Indian mothers doubles. Why? The difference in the quality of pre-natal and post natal health care may certainly be the answer.
Native American and Alaskan Indian tribes are, in fact, guaranteed health care in perpetuity by virtue of many treaties that exchange health care for access to lands that comprise a portion of the United States. However, Native American and Alaskan Indians, though the federal government provides health care to them all, are confronting their own health care crisis. Infant mortality is just a part of this awful picture. Native American and Alaskan Indians live, on average six years less than the remainder of the country, about 72.4 years. Black Americans, at least are living longer than Native Americans and Alaskan Indians, with an average life span of 74.9 years. However, left wing Democrats and socialists would guarantee black Americans and the rest of the country, much in the same way that Native Americans and Alaskan Indians are covered. Honestly, the statistics show that universal health care, extending to all person the coverage now afforded to Native and Alaskan Indians, who are reaching their own critical conclusion- would extend the inadequacies and disparities found in their health care coverage to black Americans and the rest of the country. No- that's not the answer. Let's do this. 1. Amend the Civil Rights Amendment to include medical care. Including medical care would protect black Americans AND Native American and Alaskan Indians from maltreatment, malfeasance and racial bias wherever it may exist with regard to their medical care. Discrimination is against the law. Courts, in their disbursement of awards to victims of racism, tend to be generous, while the threat of legal liability on the part of landlords, lenders, employers, etc, created a level of professional standard throughout our society that extracted racism and racial bias from its repertoire. We can easily add medical care to that framework of legal protection. In doing so, we will be making a stride forward in the name of equality that will dispel decades of abuse and neglect, lead to improvements in infant mortality and life expectancy, and the quality of life for millions of Americans. We'll also be able to put to rest, with regards to medical care, our own malfeasance in allowing such human subjugation and degradation to have occurred.