In making a case for socialism, Senator Sanders, Congressman Welch and others among the far left often reference Switzerland as a success. The left wing touts average income and education as reasons to look to Switzerland to provide a framework for socialist political and economic change in this country. Ironically, Switzerland is, in fact, a Democracy. Now a standing habit of the left wing of the Democratic Party to reference falsehoods, including the statement by Senator Sanders that people in China can own land. They cannot. Socialism, according to left wing Democrats, is also an answer to ending poverty or homelessness, and to providing suitable housing, and to educating a populace. It isn’t. In studying the world that we live in, I’ve found severe deprivation of perhaps billions of people who live in socialist countries in Asia, Southeast Asia, Africa, Central and South America, with regard to their living conditions, educational status, employment opportunities, as well as their freedom and their hope. If you confront a left wing Democrat, they might, as we’ve heard, respond, “well-- Switzerland”. I recently read the Constitution of the Swiss Federation. I was deeply moved by the country’s willingness to have placed such political power into the hands of its own people, by the detail found in their Constitution and the shear lack of authority of their own President. Its government structure is perhaps closer to a pure Democracy than our own. Their Constitution also clearly defends economic freedom and entrepreneurship, making private industry an integral part of their political framework. How is Swiss Confederation socialist? I don’t know. The Swiss Confederation or, as we know it to be, Switzerland, is comprised of numerous Cantons, what we would call states, and one Confederation akin to our own federal government. One interesting difference between the United States and Switzerland is that in Switzerland the people may request a partial or complete change to the Constitution and as well as vote to instate laws previously rejected by the Federal Assembly. Their Constitution reads very much like a series of laws, with Constitutional-like Articles pertaining to human rights and the formation of their government as it includes passages defining taxes, national highways and residence permits. Title 4, Ch.2, Art. 138, Sec. 1&2, and Art. 139. “Any 100,000 persons eligible to vote may within 18 months of the official publication of their initiative propose a total revision of the Federal Constitution.” In contrast, any Amendment to the Constitution of the United States must originate in Congress, where it will need a 2/3 majority in both Houses to be proposed and a 3/4 majority of either both Houses of Congress or state popular referendum to be in effect. Other legislative acts in Switzerland also require the vote of the people, including, accession to organizations for collective security, emergency federal acts whose term of validity exceeds on year, among others. The United States is organized as a Republic, where the people are represented. In Switzerland the people have a direct voice in the legislative process. Another unique construct exists within the Executive Branch of the Swiss government. The President of the Swiss Federation is elected for one year without the option to hold the office of the Presidency again. Also, the President may never be elected Vice President. AND- there is no signature or veto of the President required for the fashioning of law in Switzerland. As a result, the Federal Assembly holds the seat of power and authority for the Confederation. The Federal Assembly consists of the National Council and the Council of States, each comprised of Representatives elected directly by the people. Links Healthcare in Switzerland- Wikipedia
Economically, private industry and entrepreneurship are fostered and protected by their Constitution- and the People. Their Right to health care is defined as “access to adequate health care” while a primary education made available by their government is written as, “the right to an adequate and free basic education is guaranteed. Yet, the mentally ill and mentally challenged have no right to vote. Also, “Refugees may not be deported to a country where they will be persecuted” or to a country that might torture or set forth cruel and inhumane mistreatment upon their person. Meanwhile, sex offenders will face life imprisonment if convicted. Regarding retirement, illness. disability, and maternity the Swiss Confederation and the Cantons will “endeavor to ensure” against financial instability or homelessness, yet “no right may be established” to guarantee financial security during such events. However, “Persons in need and unable to provide for themselves have the right to assistance and care, and to the financial means required for a descent standard of living.” Yet the cumulative effect of the above language doesn’t appear to guarantee financial security. The meaning suggests that if such assistance is available citizens of Switzerland have the right to receive it. Also, In the Constitution of the Swiss Federation the death penalty is prohibited and gender equality with regard to compensation is stated as “equal pay for work of equal value”. Their Constitution also clearly defines a gambling tax of 80%. that appears to be a significant source of revenue, as well as other taxes, paid to either the Confederation or the Cantons. Other enhanced sales taxes include a sales tax on tobacco and alcohol. Switzerland and the United States both share second place for average number of years of schooling at 13.4 years. Both the United States and Switzerland have a populace that are 100% literate and neither the United States or Switzerland have any children moderately to severely underweight (malnourished). The United States last reported malnourished children in 2004 at 1.5%. Food Stamps, and the school lunch program that grew to include breakfast were pointed to as putting an end to child starvation in the US at that time. While there are many similarities. We’re not the same. Switzerland is clearly different in its structure from the United States. However, the country is clearly not socialist, either. The existence and legitimacy of communes in Switzerland, as per their Constitution, I also found interesting. While the Swiss Federation may regulate or deprive citizenship found by birth, marriage or adoption- also the case in the Russian Federation, if one is a member of a commune that is recognized by a Canton, one will receive citizenship to the country of Switzerland- automatically. For the record, thsi is not the case in the Russian Federation. While Russia requires two years of military or civil service of all citizens, Switzerland requires two years of military or civil service for men only. Swiss women are exempt. The above is the only comparison to Russia in the corresponding Constitutions that I found. A country that promotes private industry with more political power in the hands of the people than any other country in the world, along with a single-term one year President that has no signature-veto authority over legislation paints a picture that is the very antithesis of Russia, China or any other socialist countries. The truth is that it sounds like a great place to go on vacation.

Actually- Switzerland is a Democracy

In making a case for socialism, Senator Sanders, Congressman Welch and others among the far left often reference Switzerland as a success. The left wing touts average income and education as reasons to look to Switzerland to provide a framework for socialist political and economic change in this country. Ironically, Switzerland is, in fact, a Democracy. Now a standing habit of the left wing of the Democratic Party to reference falsehoods, including the statement by Senator Sanders that people in China can own land. They cannot. Socialism, according to left wing Democrats, is also an answer to ending poverty or homelessness, and to providing suitable housing, and to educating a populace. It isn’t. In studying the world that we live in, I’ve found severe deprivation of perhaps billions of people who live in socialist countries in Asia, Southeast Asia, Africa, Central and South America, with regard to their living conditions, educational status, employment opportunities, as well as their freedom and their hope. If you confront a left wing Democrat, they might, as we’ve heard, respond, “well-- Switzerland”. I recently read the Constitution of the Swiss Federation. I was deeply moved by the country’s willingness to have placed such political power into the hands of its own people, by the detail found in their Constitution and the shear lack of authority of their own President. Its government structure is perhaps closer to a pure Democracy than our own. Their Constitution also clearly defends economic freedom and entrepreneurship, making private industry an integral part of their political framework. How is Swiss Confederation socialist? I don’t know. The Swiss Confederation or, as we know it to be, Switzerland, is comprised of numerous Cantons, what we would call states, and one Confederation akin to our own federal government. One interesting difference between the United States and Switzerland is that in Switzerland the people may request a partial or complete change to the Constitution and as well as vote to instate laws previously rejected by the Federal Assembly. Their Constitution reads very much like a series of laws, with Constitutional-like Articles pertaining to human rights and the formation of their government as it includes passages defining taxes, national highways and residence permits. Title 4, Ch.2, Art. 138, Sec. 1&2, and Art. 139. “Any 100,000 persons eligible to vote may within 18 months of the official publication of their initiative propose a total revision of the Federal Constitution.” In contrast, any Amendment to the Constitution of the United States must originate in Congress, where it will need a 2/3 majority in both Houses to be proposed and a 3/4 majority of either both Houses of Congress or state popular referendum to be in effect. Other legislative acts in Switzerland also require the vote of the people, including, accession to organizations for collective security, emergency federal acts whose term of validity exceeds on year, among others. The United States is organized as a Republic, where the people are represented. In Switzerland the people have a direct voice in the legislative process. Another unique construct exists within the Executive Branch of the Swiss government. The President of the Swiss Federation is elected for one year without the option to hold the office of the Presidency again. Also, the President may never be elected Vice President. AND- there is no signature or veto of the President required for the fashioning of law in Switzerland. As a result, the Federal Assembly holds the seat of power and authority for the Confederation. The Federal Assembly consists of the National Council and the Council of States, each comprised of Representatives elected directly by the people. Links Healthcare in Switzerland- Wikipedia
Economically, private industry and entrepreneurship are fostered and protected by their Constitution- and the People. Their Right to health care is defined as “access to adequate health care” while a primary education made available by their government is written as, “the right to an adequate and free basic education is guaranteed. Yet, the mentally ill and mentally challenged have no right to vote. Also, “Refugees may not be deported to a country where they will be persecuted” or to a country that might torture or set forth cruel and inhumane mistreatment upon their person. Meanwhile, sex offenders will face life imprisonment if convicted. Regarding retirement, illness. disability, and maternity the Swiss Confederation and the Cantons will “endeavor to ensure” against financial instability or homelessness, yet “no right may be established” to guarantee financial security during such events. However, “Persons in need and unable to provide for themselves have the right to assistance and care, and to the financial means required for a descent standard of living.” Yet the cumulative effect of the above language doesn’t appear to guarantee financial security. The meaning suggests that if such assistance is available citizens of Switzerland have the right to receive it. Also, In the Constitution of the Swiss Federation the death penalty is prohibited and gender equality with regard to compensation is stated as “equal pay for work of equal value”. Their Constitution also clearly defines a gambling tax of 80%. that appears to be a significant source of revenue, as well as other taxes, paid to either the Confederation or the Cantons. Other enhanced sales taxes include a sales tax on tobacco and alcohol. Switzerland and the United States both share second place for average number of years of schooling at 13.4 years. Both the United States and Switzerland have a populace that are 100% literate and neither the United States or Switzerland have any children moderately to severely underweight (malnourished). The United States last reported malnourished children in 2004 at 1.5%. Food Stamps, and the school lunch program that grew to include breakfast were pointed to as putting an end to child starvation in the US at that time. While there are many similarities. We’re not the same. Switzerland is clearly different in its structure from the United States. However, the country is clearly not socialist, either. The existence and legitimacy of communes in Switzerland, as per their Constitution, I also found interesting. While the Swiss Federation may regulate or deprive citizenship found by birth, marriage or adoption- also the case in the Russian Federation, if one is a member of a commune that is recognized by a Canton, one will receive citizenship to the country of Switzerland- automatically. For the record, thsi is not the case in the Russian Federation. While Russia requires two years of military or civil service of all citizens, Switzerland requires two years of military or civil service for men only. Swiss women are exempt. The above is the only comparison to Russia in the corresponding Constitutions that I found. A country that promotes private industry with more political power in the hands of the people than any other country in the world, along with a single-term one year President that has no signature-veto authority over legislation paints a picture that is the very antithesis of Russia, China or any other socialist countries. The truth is that it sounds like a great place to go on vacation.
In making a case for socialism, Senator Sanders, Congressman Welch and others among the far left often reference Switzerland as a success. The left wing touts average income and education as reasons to look to Switzerland to provide a framework for socialist political and economic change in this country. Ironically, Switzerland is, in fact, a Democracy. Now a standing habit of the left wing of the Democratic Party to reference falsehoods, including the statement by Senator Sanders that people in China can own land. They cannot. Socialism, according to left wing Democrats, is also an answer to ending poverty or homelessness, and to providing suitable housing, and to educating a populace. It isn’t. In studying the world that we live in, I’ve found severe deprivation of perhaps billions of people who live in socialist countries in Asia, Southeast Asia, Africa, Central and South America, with regard to their living conditions, educational status, employment opportunities, as well as their freedom and their hope. If you confront a left wing Democrat, they might, as we’ve heard, respond, “well-- Switzerland”. I recently read the Constitution of the Swiss Federation. I was deeply moved by the country’s willingness to have placed such political power into the hands of its own people, by the detail found in their Constitution and the shear lack of authority of their own President. Its government structure is perhaps closer to a pure Democracy than our own. Their Constitution also clearly defends economic freedom and entrepreneurship, making private industry an integral part of their political framework. How is Swiss Confederation socialist? I don’t know. The Swiss Confederation or, as we know it to be, Switzerland, is comprised of numerous Cantons, what we would call states, and one Confederation akin to our own federal government. One interesting difference between the United States and Switzerland is that in Switzerland the people may request a partial or complete change to the Constitution and as well as vote to instate laws previously rejected by the Federal Assembly. Their Constitution reads very much like a series of laws, with Constitutional-like Articles pertaining to human rights and the formation of their government as it includes passages defining taxes, national highways and residence permits. Title 4, Ch.2, Art. 138, Sec. 1&2, and Art. 139. “Any 100,000 persons eligible to vote may within 18 months of the official publication of their initiative propose a total revision of the Federal Constitution.” In contrast, any Amendment to the Constitution of the United States must originate in Congress, where it will need a 2/3 majority in both Houses to be proposed and a 3/4 majority of either both Houses of Congress or state popular referendum to be in effect. Other legislative acts in Switzerland also require the vote of the people, including, accession to organizations for collective security, emergency federal acts whose term of validity exceeds on year, among others. The United States is organized as a Republic, where the people are represented. In Switzerland the people have a direct voice in the legislative process. Another unique construct exists within the Executive Branch of the Swiss government. The President of the Swiss Federation is elected for one year without the option to hold the office of the Presidency again. Also, the President may never be elected Vice President. AND- there is no signature or veto of the President required for the fashioning of law in Switzerland. As a result, the Federal Assembly holds the seat of power and authority for the Confederation. The Federal Assembly consists of the National Council and the Council of States, each comprised of Representatives elected directly by the people. Links Healthcare in Switzerland- Wikipedia
Economically, private industry and entrepreneurship are fostered and protected by their Constitution- and the People. Their Right to health care is defined as “access to adequate health care” while a primary education made available by their government is written as, “the right to an adequate and free basic education is guaranteed. Yet, the mentally ill and mentally challenged have no right to vote. Also, “Refugees may not be deported to a country where they will be persecuted” or to a country that might torture or set forth cruel and inhumane mistreatment upon their person. Meanwhile, sex offenders will face life imprisonment if convicted. Regarding retirement, illness. disability, and maternity the Swiss Confederation and the Cantons will “endeavor to ensure” against financial instability or homelessness, yet “no right may be established” to guarantee financial security during such events. However, “Persons in need and unable to provide for themselves have the right to assistance and care, and to the financial means required for a descent standard of living.” Yet the cumulative effect of the above language doesn’t appear to guarantee financial security. The meaning suggests that if such assistance is available citizens of Switzerland have the right to receive it. Also, In the Constitution of the Swiss Federation the death penalty is prohibited and gender equality with regard to compensation is stated as “equal pay for work of equal value”. Their Constitution also clearly defines a gambling tax of 80%. that appears to be a significant source of revenue, as well as other taxes, paid to either the Confederation or the Cantons. Other enhanced sales taxes include a sales tax on tobacco and alcohol. Switzerland and the United States both share second place for average number of years of schooling at 13.4 years. Both the United States and Switzerland have a populace that are 100% literate and neither the United States or Switzerland have any children moderately to severely underweight (malnourished). The United States last reported malnourished children in 2004 at 1.5%. Food Stamps, and the school lunch program that grew to include breakfast were pointed to as putting an end to child starvation in the US at that time. While there are many similarities. We’re not the same. Switzerland is clearly different in its structure from the United States. However, the country is clearly not socialist, either. The existence and legitimacy of communes in Switzerland, as per their Constitution, I also found interesting. While the Swiss Federation may regulate or deprive citizenship found by birth, marriage or adoption- also the case in the Russian Federation, if one is a member of a commune that is recognized by a Canton, one will receive citizenship to the country of Switzerland- automatically. For the record, thsi is not the case in the Russian Federation. While Russia requires two years of military or civil service of all citizens, Switzerland requires two years of military or civil service for men only. Swiss women are exempt. The above is the only comparison to Russia in the corresponding Constitutions that I found. A country that promotes private industry with more political power in the hands of the people than any other country in the world, along with a single-term one year President that has no signature-veto authority over legislation paints a picture that is the very antithesis of Russia, China or any other socialist countries. The truth is that it sounds like a great place to go on vacation.
In making a case for socialism, Senator Sanders, Congressman Welch and others among the far left often reference Switzerland as a success. The left wing touts average income and education as reasons to look to Switzerland to provide a framework for socialist political and economic change in this country. Ironically, Switzerland is, in fact, a Democracy. Now a standing habit of the left wing of the Democratic Party to reference falsehoods, including the statement by Senator Sanders that people in China can own land. They cannot. Socialism, according to left wing Democrats, is also an answer to ending poverty or homelessness, and to providing suitable housing, and to educating a populace. It isn’t. In studying the world that we live in, I’ve found severe deprivation of perhaps billions of people who live in socialist countries in Asia, Southeast Asia, Africa, Central and South America, with regard to their living conditions, educational status, employment opportunities, as well as their freedom and their hope. If you confront a left wing Democrat, they might, as we’ve heard, respond, “well-- Switzerland”. I recently read the Constitution of the Swiss Federation. I was deeply moved by the country’s willingness to have placed such political power into the hands of its own people, by the detail found in their Constitution and the shear lack of authority of their own President. Its government structure is perhaps closer to a pure Democracy than our own. Their Constitution also clearly defends economic freedom and entrepreneurship, making private industry an integral part of their political framework. How is Swiss Confederation socialist? I don’t know. The Swiss Confederation or, as we know it to be, Switzerland, is comprised of numerous Cantons, what we would call states, and one Confederation akin to our own federal government. One interesting difference between the United States and Switzerland is that in Switzerland the people may request a partial or complete change to the Constitution and as well as vote to instate laws previously rejected by the Federal Assembly. Their Constitution reads very much like a series of laws, with Constitutional-like Articles pertaining to human rights and the formation of their government as it includes passages defining taxes, national highways and residence permits. Title 4, Ch.2, Art. 138, Sec. 1&2, and Art. 139. “Any 100,000 persons eligible to vote may within 18 months of the official publication of their initiative propose a total revision of the Federal Constitution.” In contrast, any Amendment to the Constitution of the United States must originate in Congress, where it will need a 2/3 majority in both Houses to be proposed and a 3/4 majority of either both Houses of Congress or state popular referendum to be in effect. Other legislative acts in Switzerland also require the vote of the people, including, accession to organizations for collective security, emergency federal acts whose term of validity exceeds on year, among others. The United States is organized as a Republic, where the people are represented. In Switzerland the people have a direct voice in the legislative process. Another unique construct exists within the Executive Branch of the Swiss government. The President of the Swiss Federation is elected for one year without the option to hold the office of the Presidency again. Also, the President may never be elected Vice President. AND- there is no signature or veto of the President required for the fashioning of law in Switzerland. As a result, the Federal Assembly holds the seat of power and authority for the Confederation. The Federal Assembly consists of the National Council and the Council of States, each comprised of Representatives elected directly by the people. Links Healthcare in Switzerland- Wikipedia
Economically, private industry and entrepreneurship are fostered and protected by their Constitution- and the People. Their Right to health care is defined as “access to adequate health care” while a primary education made available by their government is written as, “the right to an adequate and free basic education is guaranteed. Yet, the mentally ill and mentally challenged have no right to vote. Also, “Refugees may not be deported to a country where they will be persecuted” or to a country that might torture or set forth cruel and inhumane mistreatment upon their person. Meanwhile, sex offenders will face life imprisonment if convicted. Regarding retirement, illness. disability, and maternity the Swiss Confederation and the Cantons will “endeavor to ensure” against financial instability or homelessness, yet “no right may be established” to guarantee financial security during such events. However, “Persons in need and unable to provide for themselves have the right to assistance and care, and to the financial means required for a descent standard of living.” Yet the cumulative effect of the above language doesn’t appear to guarantee financial security. The meaning suggests that if such assistance is available citizens of Switzerland have the right to receive it. Also, In the Constitution of the Swiss Federation the death penalty is prohibited and gender equality with regard to compensation is stated as “equal pay for work of equal value”. Their Constitution also clearly defines a gambling tax of 80%. that appears to be a significant source of revenue, as well as other taxes, paid to either the Confederation or the Cantons. Other enhanced sales taxes include a sales tax on tobacco and alcohol. Switzerland and the United States both share second place for average number of years of schooling at 13.4 years. Both the United States and Switzerland have a populace that are 100% literate and neither the United States or Switzerland have any children moderately to severely underweight (malnourished). The United States last reported malnourished children in 2004 at 1.5%. Food Stamps, and the school lunch program that grew to include breakfast were pointed to as putting an end to child starvation in the US at that time. While there are many similarities. We’re not the same. Switzerland is clearly different in its structure from the United States. However, the country is clearly not socialist, either. The existence and legitimacy of communes in Switzerland, as per their Constitution, I also found interesting. While the Swiss Federation may regulate or deprive citizenship found by birth, marriage or adoption- also the case in the Russian Federation, if one is a member of a commune that is recognized by a Canton, one will receive citizenship to the country of Switzerland- automatically. For the record, thsi is not the case in the Russian Federation. While Russia requires two years of military or civil service of all citizens, Switzerland requires two years of military or civil service for men only. Swiss women are exempt. The above is the only comparison to Russia in the corresponding Constitutions that I found. A country that promotes private industry with more political power in the hands of the people than any other country in the world, along with a single-term one year President that has no signature-veto authority over legislation paints a picture that is the very antithesis of Russia, China or any other socialist countries. The truth is that it sounds like a great place to go on vacation.
In making a case for socialism, Senator Sanders, Congressman Welch and others among the far left often reference Switzerland as a success. The left wing touts average income and education as reasons to look to Switzerland to provide a framework for socialist political and economic change in this country. Ironically, Switzerland is, in fact, a Democracy. Now a standing habit of the left wing of the Democratic Party to reference falsehoods, including the statement by Senator Sanders that people in China can own land. They cannot. Socialism, according to left wing Democrats, is also an answer to ending poverty or homelessness, and to providing suitable housing, and to educating a populace. It isn’t. In studying the world that we live in, I’ve found severe deprivation of perhaps billions of people who live in socialist countries in Asia, Southeast Asia, Africa, Central and South America, with regard to their living conditions, educational status, employment opportunities, as well as their freedom and their hope. If you confront a left wing Democrat, they might, as we’ve heard, respond, “well-- Switzerland”. I recently read the Constitution of the Swiss Federation. I was deeply moved by the country’s willingness to have placed such political power into the hands of its own people, by the detail found in their Constitution and the shear lack of authority of their own President. Its government structure is perhaps closer to a pure Democracy than our own. Their Constitution also clearly defends economic freedom and entrepreneurship, making private industry an integral part of their political framework. How is Swiss Confederation socialist? I don’t know. The Swiss Confederation or, as we know it to be, Switzerland, is comprised of numerous Cantons, what we would call states, and one Confederation akin to our own federal government. One interesting difference between the United States and Switzerland is that in Switzerland the people may request a partial or complete change to the Constitution and as well as vote to instate laws previously rejected by the Federal Assembly. Their Constitution reads very much like a series of laws, with Constitutional-like Articles pertaining to human rights and the formation of their government as it includes passages defining taxes, national highways and residence permits. Title 4, Ch.2, Art. 138, Sec. 1&2, and Art. 139. “Any 100,000 persons eligible to vote may within 18 months of the official publication of their initiative propose a total revision of the Federal Constitution.” In contrast, any Amendment to the Constitution of the United States must originate in Congress, where it will need a 2/3 majority in both Houses to be proposed and a 3/4 majority of either both Houses of Congress or state popular referendum to be in effect. Other legislative acts in Switzerland also require the vote of the people, including, accession to organizations for collective security, emergency federal acts whose term of validity exceeds on year, among others. The United States is organized as a Republic, where the people are represented. In Switzerland the people have a direct voice in the legislative process. Another unique construct exists within the Executive Branch of the Swiss government. The President of the Swiss Federation is elected for one year without the option to hold the office of the Presidency again. Also, the President may never be elected Vice President. AND- there is no signature or veto of the President required for the fashioning of law in Switzerland. As a result, the Federal Assembly holds the seat of power and authority for the Confederation. The Federal Assembly consists of the National Council and the Council of States, each comprised of Representatives elected directly by the people. Links Healthcare in Switzerland- Wikipedia
Economically, private industry and entrepreneurship are fostered and protected by their Constitution- and the People. Their Right to health care is defined as “access to adequate health care” while a primary education made available by their government is written as, “the right to an adequate and free basic education is guaranteed. Yet, the mentally ill and mentally challenged have no right to vote. Also, “Refugees may not be deported to a country where they will be persecuted” or to a country that might torture or set forth cruel and inhumane mistreatment upon their person. Meanwhile, sex offenders will face life imprisonment if convicted. Regarding retirement, illness. disability, and maternity the Swiss Confederation and the Cantons will “endeavor to ensure” against financial instability or homelessness, yet “no right may be established” to guarantee financial security during such events. However, “Persons in need and unable to provide for themselves have the right to assistance and care, and to the financial means required for a descent standard of living.” Yet the cumulative effect of the above language doesn’t appear to guarantee financial security. The meaning suggests that if such assistance is available citizens of Switzerland have the right to receive it. Also, In the Constitution of the Swiss Federation the death penalty is prohibited and gender equality with regard to compensation is stated as “equal pay for work of equal value”. Their Constitution also clearly defines a gambling tax of 80%. that appears to be a significant source of revenue, as well as other taxes, paid to either the Confederation or the Cantons. Other enhanced sales taxes include a sales tax on tobacco and alcohol. Switzerland and the United States both share second place for average number of years of schooling at 13.4 years. Both the United States and Switzerland have a populace that are 100% literate and neither the United States or Switzerland have any children moderately to severely underweight (malnourished). The United States last reported malnourished children in 2004 at 1.5%. Food Stamps, and the school lunch program that grew to include breakfast were pointed to as putting an end to child starvation in the US at that time. While there are many similarities. We’re not the same. Switzerland is clearly different in its structure from the United States. However, the country is clearly not socialist, either. The existence and legitimacy of communes in Switzerland, as per their Constitution, I also found interesting. While the Swiss Federation may regulate or deprive citizenship found by birth, marriage or adoption- also the case in the Russian Federation, if one is a member of a commune that is recognized by a Canton, one will receive citizenship to the country of Switzerland- automatically. For the record, thsi is not the case in the Russian Federation. While Russia requires two years of military or civil service of all citizens, Switzerland requires two years of military or civil service for men only. Swiss women are exempt. The above is the only comparison to Russia in the corresponding Constitutions that I found. A country that promotes private industry with more political power in the hands of the people than any other country in the world, along with a single-term one year President that has no signature-veto authority over legislation paints a picture that is the very antithesis of Russia, China or any other socialist countries. The truth is that it sounds like a great place to go on vacation.