Poverty exists throughout the world. To presume that socialism has negated economic devastation, inhumane living conditions, homelessness, as well as illiteracy, is to literally put one's head in a bucket of sand. While Statista counts the number of homeless persons worldwide for 2019 as 79.5 million, Wikipedia cites YaleGlobal Online's estimate of 150 million. Others estimate world homelessness as of 2018 at 100 million. In the United States, homeless persons for 2019 exceeded 560,000. Socialism certainly didn't negate homelessness or poverty. Even Germany, whose population received an average number of years of education of 14.1 years in 2017, the only country in the world that exceeded the United States for education gaged at 13.4 years for the same year, had 650,000 homeless persons in 2017 with a population of 82.6 million. Numbers are also quoted per 10,000 inhabitants. For 2017, 79 homeless persons per 10,000 contrasts sharply with the United States 17 homeless persons per 10,000 (2019). Other interesting comparisons include 46 homeless persons per 10,000 in the United Kingdom (2016), 1200 per 10,000 in Egypt, 560 per 10,000 in Peru (2011), Guatemala 315 per 10,000, 94 per 10,000 New Zealand, 136 per 10,000 in Indonesia and 36 per 10,000 in Canada. Haiti, Honduras and Nigeria posted especially high rates of homeless persons. While the available numbers date back some years, the message is clear. Haiti 2324 per 10,000 (2010) Honduras 1235 per 10,000 (2013) Nigeria 1658 per 10,000 (2007) In addition, the number of homeless persons worldwide has been rising since 2012. Statista counts refugees, asylum seekers and internally displaced persons as homeless.
The plight of the homeless person also includes a dramatic surge in the death rate. The UK's Office for National Statistics recently unveiled new findings regarding homeless persons in England and Wales finding that homeless persons have a death rate 9 times greater than those who live in dwellings.
Worldwide poverty also includes persons living in substandard housing, many who receive a very modest hourly wage. As of November 2019, more than 600 million people in Sub-Sahara Africa live without electricity, accounting for virtually half the population. Combining severely inadequate living conditions with less than $2 in personal consumption for over 40% of the population doesn't help. Also, this problem isn't unique to Sub-Sahara Africa. In 2018, only 45% of people in Haiti had access to electricity, while 66.3% of the population in Myanmar had access to electricity for same year, 62% in Yemen, 86% in Syria, 59.8% in Sudan, 28.2% in South Sudan, 35.3% in Somalia, 67% in Senegal, 95.2% in Peru, 71.1% in Pakistan, and 88.1% in Nicaragua. Vast numbers of the populace in many countries, in fact, live in "slums" that involve substandard living conditions, though may have access to electricity. Poverty also impacts children throughout the world. The following is a list of the percent of children under the age of 5 per country with the worst 18 countries presented. East Timor 45.3% India 43.5% Yemen 43.1% Bangladesh 41.3% Niger 39.9% Madagascar 36.8% Burundi 35.2% Eritrea 34.5% Chad 33.9% Afghanistan 32.9% Somalia 32.8% Sudan 31.7% Laos 31.6% Pakistan 30.9% Djibouti 29.6% Ethiopia 29.2% Nepal 29.1% Cambodia 29% The country with the fewest underweight children is Chile with .5% as of 2008. The most recent posting for the United States was in 2004 with 1.3% of American children under the age of 5 found to be moderately or severely underweight. The data from many countries may be posted as some years in the past for various reasons. Please click on the chart below for a complete list. As I've been do some digging and finding some statistics, including the above, I have not found a case for socialism. Indeed, Democracy allows for prosperity, educational opportunities, entrepreneurship and innovation. Social and political freedom breed better living conditions and less pollution, better sanitation and access to electricity and indoor plumbing. Socialist countries tout government work. However, government work is clearly not made available to everyone. Socialist countries also provide primary and secondary education. However, people in most socialist countries by far, do not receive even a high school diploma. In fact, many persons in socialist countries are illiterate or undereducated, receiving less than a 7th grade education. While illiteracy and substandard education are clearly correlated with child hunger and sub standard living conditions, the plight of billions of people around the world may be attributed to socialism, certainly not a lack thereof. Socialist countries have empowered their corresponding governments to oversee their people, Keep in mind that when we look at the above statistics, we see the work of socialism and many people who exist at the mercy of their corresponding government.
Poverty exists throughout the world. To presume that socialism has negated economic devastation, inhumane living conditions, homelessness, as well as illiteracy, is to literally put one's head in a bucket of sand. While Statista counts the number of homeless persons worldwide for 2019 as 79.5 million, Wikipedia cites YaleGlobal Online's estimate of 150 million. Others estimate world homelessness as of 2018 at 100 million. In the United States, homeless persons for 2019 exceeded 560,000. Socialism certainly didn't negate homelessness or poverty. Even Germany, whose population received an average number of years of education of 14.1 years in 2017, the only country in the world that exceeded the United States for education gaged at 13.4 years for the same year, had 650,000 homeless persons in 2017 with a population of 82.6 million. Numbers are also quoted per 10,000 inhabitants. For 2017, 79 homeless persons per 10,000 contrasts sharply with the United States 17 homeless persons per 10,000 (2019). Other interesting comparisons include 46 homeless persons per 10,000 in the United Kingdom (2016), 1200 per 10,000 in Egypt, 560 per 10,000 in Peru (2011), Guatemala 315 per 10,000, 94 per 10,000 New Zealand, 136 per 10,000 in Indonesia and 36 per 10,000 in Canada. Haiti, Honduras and Nigeria posted especially high rates of homeless persons. While the available numbers date back some years, the message is clear. Haiti 2324 per 10,000 (2010) Honduras 1235 per 10,000 (2013) Nigeria 1658 per 10,000 (2007) In addition, the number of homeless persons worldwide has been rising since 2012. Statista counts refugees, asylum seekers and internally displaced persons as homeless.
The plight of the homeless person also includes a dramatic surge in the death rate. The UK's Office for National Statistics recently unveiled new findings regarding homeless persons in England and Wales finding that homeless persons have a death rate 9 times greater than those who live in dwellings.
Worldwide poverty also includes persons living in substandard housing, many who receive a very modest hourly wage. As of November 2019, more than 600 million people in Sub-Sahara Africa live without electricity, accounting for virtually half the population. Combining severely inadequate living conditions with less than $2 in personal consumption for over 40% of the population doesn't help. Also, this problem isn't unique to Sub-Sahara Africa. In 2018, only 45% of people in Haiti had access to electricity, while 66.3% of the population in Myanmar had access to electricity for same year, 62% in Yemen, 86% in Syria, 59.8% in Sudan, 28.2% in South Sudan, 35.3% in Somalia, 67% in Senegal, 95.2% in Peru, 71.1% in Pakistan, and 88.1% in Nicaragua. Vast numbers of the populace in many countries, in fact, live in "slums" that involve substandard living conditions, though may have access to electricity. Poverty also impacts children throughout the world. The following is a list of the percent of children under the age of 5 per country with the worst 18 countries presented. East Timor 45.3% India 43.5% Yemen 43.1% Bangladesh 41.3% Niger 39.9% Madagascar 36.8% Burundi 35.2% Eritrea 34.5% Chad 33.9% Afghanistan 32.9% Somalia 32.8% Sudan 31.7% Laos 31.6% Pakistan 30.9% Djibouti 29.6% Ethiopia 29.2% Nepal 29.1% Cambodia 29% The country with the fewest underweight children is Chile with .5% as of 2008. The most recent posting for the United States was in 2004 with 1.3% of American children under the age of 5 found to be moderately or severely underweight. The data from many countries may be posted as some years in the past for various reasons. Please click on the chart below for a complete list. As I've been do some digging and finding some statistics, including the above, I have not found a case for socialism. Indeed, Democracy allows for prosperity, educational opportunities, entrepreneurship and innovation. Social and political freedom breed better living conditions and less pollution, better sanitation and access to electricity and indoor plumbing. Socialist countries tout government work. However, government work is clearly not made available to everyone. Socialist countries also provide primary and secondary education. However, people in most socialist countries by far, do not receive even a high school diploma. In fact, many persons in socialist countries are illiterate or undereducated, receiving less than a 7th grade education. While illiteracy and substandard education are clearly correlated with child hunger and sub standard living conditions, the plight of billions of people around the world may be attributed to socialism, certainly not a lack thereof. Socialist countries have empowered their corresponding governments to oversee their people, Keep in mind that when we look at the above statistics, we see the work of socialism and many people who exist at the mercy of their corresponding government.
Poverty exists throughout the world. To presume that socialism has negated economic devastation, inhumane living conditions, homelessness, as well as illiteracy, is to literally put one's head in a bucket of sand. While Statista counts the number of homeless persons worldwide for 2019 as 79.5 million, Wikipedia cites YaleGlobal Online's estimate of 150 million. Others estimate world homelessness as of 2018 at 100 million. In the United States, homeless persons for 2019 exceeded 560,000. Socialism certainly didn't negate homelessness or poverty. Even Germany, whose population received an average number of years of education of 14.1 years in 2017, the only country in the world that exceeded the United States for education gaged at 13.4 years for the same year, had 650,000 homeless persons in 2017 with a population of 82.6 million. Numbers are also quoted per 10,000 inhabitants. For 2017, 79 homeless persons per 10,000 contrasts sharply with the United States 17 homeless persons per 10,000 (2019). Other interesting comparisons include 46 homeless persons per 10,000 in the United Kingdom (2016), 1200 per 10,000 in Egypt, 560 per 10,000 in Peru (2011), Guatemala 315 per 10,000, 94 per 10,000 New Zealand, 136 per 10,000 in Indonesia and 36 per 10,000 in Canada. Haiti, Honduras and Nigeria posted especially high rates of homeless persons. While the available numbers date back some years, the message is clear. Haiti 2324 per 10,000 (2010) Honduras 1235 per 10,000 (2013) Nigeria 1658 per 10,000 (2007) In addition, the number of homeless persons worldwide has been rising since 2012. Statista counts refugees, asylum seekers and internally displaced persons as homeless.
The plight of the homeless person also includes a dramatic surge in the death rate. The UK's Office for National Statistics recently unveiled new findings regarding homeless persons in England and Wales finding that homeless persons have a death rate 9 times greater than those who live in dwellings.
Worldwide poverty also includes persons living in substandard housing, many who receive a very modest hourly wage. As of November 2019, more than 600 million people in Sub-Sahara Africa live without electricity, accounting for virtually half the population. Combining severely inadequate living conditions with less than $2 in personal consumption for over 40% of the population doesn't help. Also, this problem isn't unique to Sub-Sahara Africa. In 2018, only 45% of people in Haiti had access to electricity, while 66.3% of the population in Myanmar had access to electricity for same year, 62% in Yemen, 86% in Syria, 59.8% in Sudan, 28.2% in South Sudan, 35.3% in Somalia, 67% in Senegal, 95.2% in Peru, 71.1% in Pakistan, and 88.1% in Nicaragua. Vast numbers of the populace in many countries, in fact, live in "slums" that involve substandard living conditions, though may have access to electricity. Poverty also impacts children throughout the world. The following is a list of the percent of children under the age of 5 per country with the worst 18 countries presented. East Timor 45.3% India 43.5% Yemen 43.1% Bangladesh 41.3% Niger 39.9% Madagascar 36.8% Burundi 35.2% Eritrea 34.5% Chad 33.9% Afghanistan 32.9% Somalia 32.8% Sudan 31.7% Laos 31.6% Pakistan 30.9% Djibouti 29.6% Ethiopia 29.2% Nepal 29.1% Cambodia 29% The country with the fewest underweight children is Chile with .5% as of 2008. The most recent posting for the United States was in 2004 with 1.3% of American children under the age of 5 found to be moderately or severely underweight. The data from many countries may be posted as some years in the past for various reasons. Please click on the chart below for a complete list. As I've been do some digging and finding some statistics, including the above, I have not found a case for socialism. Indeed, Democracy allows for prosperity, educational opportunities, entrepreneurship and innovation. Social and political freedom breed better living conditions and less pollution, better sanitation and access to electricity and indoor plumbing. Socialist countries tout government work. However, government work is clearly not made available to everyone. Socialist countries also provide primary and secondary education. However, people in most socialist countries by far, do not receive even a high school diploma. In fact, many persons in socialist countries are illiterate or undereducated, receiving less than a 7th grade education. While illiteracy and substandard education are clearly correlated with child hunger and sub standard living conditions, the plight of billions of people around the world may be attributed to socialism, certainly not a lack thereof. Socialist countries have empowered their corresponding governments to oversee their people, Keep in mind that when we look at the above statistics, we see the work of socialism and many people who exist at the mercy of their corresponding government.
Poverty exists throughout the world. To presume that socialism has negated economic devastation, inhumane living conditions, homelessness, as well as illiteracy, is to literally put one's head in a bucket of sand. While Statista counts the number of homeless persons worldwide for 2019 as 79.5 million, Wikipedia cites YaleGlobal Online's estimate of 150 million. Others estimate world homelessness as of 2018 at 100 million. In the United States, homeless persons for 2019 exceeded 560,000. Socialism certainly didn't negate homelessness or poverty. Even Germany, whose population received an average number of years of education of 14.1 years in 2017, the only country in the world that exceeded the United States for education gaged at 13.4 years for the same year, had 650,000 homeless persons in 2017 with a population of 82.6 million. Numbers are also quoted per 10,000 inhabitants. For 2017, 79 homeless persons per 10,000 contrasts sharply with the United States 17 homeless persons per 10,000 (2019). Other interesting comparisons include 46 homeless persons per 10,000 in the United Kingdom (2016), 1200 per 10,000 in Egypt, 560 per 10,000 in Peru (2011), Guatemala 315 per 10,000, 94 per 10,000 New Zealand, 136 per 10,000 in Indonesia and 36 per 10,000 in Canada. Haiti, Honduras and Nigeria posted especially high rates of homeless persons. While the available numbers date back some years, the message is clear. Haiti 2324 per 10,000 (2010) Honduras 1235 per 10,000 (2013) Nigeria 1658 per 10,000 (2007) In addition, the number of homeless persons worldwide has been rising since 2012. Statista counts refugees, asylum seekers and internally displaced persons as homeless.
The plight of the homeless person also includes a dramatic surge in the death rate. The UK's Office for National Statistics recently unveiled new findings regarding homeless persons in England and Wales finding that homeless persons have a death rate 9 times greater than those who live in dwellings.
Worldwide poverty also includes persons living in substandard housing, many who receive a very modest hourly wage. As of November 2019, more than 600 million people in Sub-Sahara Africa live without electricity, accounting for virtually half the population. Combining severely inadequate living conditions with less than $2 in personal consumption for over 40% of the population doesn't help. Also, this problem isn't unique to Sub-Sahara Africa. In 2018, only 45% of people in Haiti had access to electricity, while 66.3% of the population in Myanmar had access to electricity for same year, 62% in Yemen, 86% in Syria, 59.8% in Sudan, 28.2% in South Sudan, 35.3% in Somalia, 67% in Senegal, 95.2% in Peru, 71.1% in Pakistan, and 88.1% in Nicaragua. Vast numbers of the populace in many countries, in fact, live in "slums" that involve substandard living conditions, though may have access to electricity. Poverty also impacts children throughout the world. The following is a list of the percent of children under the age of 5 per country with the worst 18 countries presented. East Timor 45.3% India 43.5% Yemen 43.1% Bangladesh 41.3% Niger 39.9% Madagascar 36.8% Burundi 35.2% Eritrea 34.5% Chad 33.9% Afghanistan 32.9% Somalia 32.8% Sudan 31.7% Laos 31.6% Pakistan 30.9% Djibouti 29.6% Ethiopia 29.2% Nepal 29.1% Cambodia 29% The country with the fewest underweight children is Chile with .5% as of 2008. The most recent posting for the United States was in 2004 with 1.3% of American children under the age of 5 found to be moderately or severely underweight. The data from many countries may be posted as some years in the past for various reasons. Please click on the chart below for a complete list. As I've been do some digging and finding some statistics, including the above, I have not found a case for socialism. Indeed, Democracy allows for prosperity, educational opportunities, entrepreneurship and innovation. Social and political freedom breed better living conditions and less pollution, better sanitation and access to electricity and indoor plumbing. Socialist countries tout government work. However, government work is clearly not made available to everyone. Socialist countries also provide primary and secondary education. However, people in most socialist countries by far, do not receive even a high school diploma. In fact, many persons in socialist countries are illiterate or undereducated, receiving less than a 7th grade education. While illiteracy and substandard education are clearly correlated with child hunger and sub standard living conditions, the plight of billions of people around the world may be attributed to socialism, certainly not a lack thereof. Socialist countries have empowered their corresponding governments to oversee their people, Keep in mind that when we look at the above statistics, we see the work of socialism and many people who exist at the mercy of their corresponding government.