The key to the health care crisis is lower costs. Lower costs relating to prescriptions will alleviate 7/8ths of Medicare/Medicaid disbursements, an indicator for the industry as a whole. Prescriptions dispensed 2018 cost $4.21 billion, while personal retail expenditures for the same year were$335 billion, the difference paid by health care insurers and consumers. Whose hiking the costs? Retailers like Walgreens, Walmart and many more that purchase pharmaceuticals wholesale and sell to the general public via prescription- retail with the up-charge costing health care insurers and Americans hundreds of billions of dollars. Striking at pharmaceutical companies for their wares is a top priority in Washington. The dialog, however, has yet to include the pharmaceutical retail industry that is responsible for the vast majority of excessive pricing- the root of a health care crisis, as dubbed by many lawmakers. With many pharmaceuticals having been available for years and dozens losing their patent protection within the next two years, pharmaceutical companies may fair game for generic manufacturers in the near term. As lawmakers seek to dramatically reduce costs to health care insurers and begin the process of opening world markets, two venues may be just what the doctor ordered. -- Limit mark-up pricing at the retail level. In looking at the numbers for 2018 pricing advanced 7960% from wholesale to retail. Limiting markup to a reasonable level can immediately eliminate the necessary spending of over 300 billion a year by health care insurers and Americans -- Open the doors for generic manufacturing. Let's get this show on the road. Mylan Labs is one generic pharmaceutical manufacturer that has a longstanding reputation in the industry. Barriers to entry may certainly exist that deny entry to worthy competitors. --Pharmaceutical companies need to be in the loop. The United States leads the world in medical advancement and pharmaceuticals. We need to communicate with these companies, discover their true concerns and work to build foreign markets. However, costs aren't the only problem. Medicare recipients lost necessary coverage in 2010 due to President Obama's initiative to build US Healthcare with the exclusion of those impoverished from receiving the same level of benefits as those who could afford them. Insulin, MRI Testing, Physical Therapy, Chiropractic care need to be restored. I am firmly in favor of restoring Medicare benefits with the inclusion of coverage for eye glasses, hearing aid devices and dentures. A remnant of the Obama Administration, US Healthcare, is costing American taxpayers a considerable amount of money as it is state subsidized while subscribers receive a tax credit. US Healthcare also necessitates an escrow of over $1 trilion based upon actuarial tables for the purpose of covering - originally- 30 million Americans. US Healthcare now has a subscriber base of under 8 million, without ever having reached more than 12 million subscribers. Both Democrats and Republicans in the House and the Senate have stated that US Healthcare is broken. However, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Enhancement HR 1425 passed the House 230-180 on June 25, 2020. HR1425 funds US Healthcare with additional state subsidies that will be used, in part, for marketing and sales of US Healthcare. Recall that US Healthcare was built with marketing efforts by the Obama Administration, funded by taxpayer dollars. I oppose spending taxpayer dollars for the purpose of further funding the marketing of US Healthcare. I also oppose spending for the purpose of adding to state subsidies that would provide monthly insurance rate cuts. We have a private insurance industry that has been crippled in having to compete with American taxpayer dollars subsidizing tax credits and state subsidies that lower subscriber's monthly costs. This bill will also limit pharmaceutical makers in their profitability and will thus will curtail medical advancement and medical technology going forward. Our medical industry is the envy of the world. While HR 1425 targets the pharmaceutical industry, it doesn't mention pharmaceutical retailers- the true culprit. Instead, HR 1425 targets research and development of our biotechnology/pharmaceutical industry by making all pharmaceuticals subject to price controls whether they're new to market or not. Let's get back to the garden.
Here's a Plan --Limit retail mark-up of prescriptions to no more than triple the wholesale cost. Typical retail mark-ups range in the 2-3 times wholesale range. Clearly, the retail market has been taking advantage of the necessity of such items, that, being prescribed by their doctor, are necessary to their health. The Federal Trade Commission Act of 1914 allows Congress to act in the event that there is a crisis in cost to consumers in a given industry due to monopolistic practices. The concept of monopoly exists, in that, drug companies are protected by patents. However, the concept of necessity also makes for a monopolistic situation with regard to a prescription. --Open global markets to pharmaceutical companies. While President Trump brought fairness to pharmaceutical pricing, as prices of a given drug must now be the same for all, those prices may be excluding the US from world markets. Since 2017, China and Syria both responded that US pharmaceuticals are too expensive. --55 Pharmaceutical Patents will expire between now and 2022 making the inclusion of generic drug companies into the supply side of this equation a factor. Federal lawmakers can work to foster the development of generic pharmaceutical companies who will be receptive to providing pharmaceuticals at a significantly lower cost to retailers. --Restore Medicaid/Medicare- It is imperative that all Americans have access to descent health care. Those who are poor need it the most. --close US Healthcare- I believe that, in hindsight, lawmakers will look back on the number of years and the amount of money spent on US Healthcare and admit to it being a mistake. Why? US Healthcare is not actually available to all Americans. Regions of the country are devoid of access to US Healthcare for Americans as there are no doctors who are providing access to the coverage in a given locale. US Healthcare is costly to American taxpayers and hurts private insurers. The private insurance industry, at present has to compete with a tax credit and subsidized costs to rate payers. The arrangement is a grossly unfair business practice on the part of the US Federal government. We are competing with a private industry with taxpayer dollars and we shouldn't be doing that. Letting US Healthcare drift to its conclusion may only take a few years, without taxpayer money being spent on marketing or additional subsidies. I prefer to see it close and incorporate subscribers into a restored Medicaid/Medicare system. **The debate in the US House of Representatives regarding HR1425 includes arguments from Republican Congressman to reduce pricing by pharmaceutical retailers, such as Walgreens and Walmart. The numbers and the cost savings were included, but to no avail. House Democrats insist on their platform, even though the answer is staring them in the face. This Republican in the House would help.
The key to the health care crisis is lower costs. Lower costs relating to prescriptions will alleviate 7/8ths of Medicare/Medicaid disbursements, an indicator for the industry as a whole. Prescriptions dispensed 2018 cost $4.21 billion, while personal retail expenditures for the same year were$335 billion, the difference paid by health care insurers and consumers. Whose hiking the costs? Retailers like Walgreens, Walmart and many more that purchase pharmaceuticals wholesale and sell to the general public via prescription- retail with the up-charge costing health care insurers and Americans hundreds of billions of dollars. Striking at pharmaceutical companies for their wares is a top priority in Washington. The dialog, however, has yet to include the pharmaceutical retail industry that is responsible for the vast majority of excessive pricing- the root of a health care crisis, as dubbed by many lawmakers. With many pharmaceuticals having been available for years and dozens losing their patent protection within the next two years, pharmaceutical companies may fair game for generic manufacturers in the near term. As lawmakers seek to dramatically reduce costs to health care insurers and begin the process of opening world markets, two venues may be just what the doctor ordered. -- Limit mark-up pricing at the retail level. In looking at the numbers for 2018 pricing advanced 7960% from wholesale to retail. Limiting markup to a reasonable level can immediately eliminate the necessary spending of over 300 billion a year by health care insurers and Americans -- Open the doors for generic manufacturing. Let's get this show on the road. Mylan Labs is one generic pharmaceutical manufacturer that has a longstanding reputation in the industry. Barriers to entry may certainly exist that deny entry to worthy competitors. --Pharmaceutical companies need to be in the loop. The United States leads the world in medical advancement and pharmaceuticals. We need to communicate with these companies, discover their true concerns and work to build foreign markets. However, costs aren't the only problem. Medicare recipients lost necessary coverage in 2010 due to President Obama's initiative to build US Healthcare with the exclusion of those impoverished from receiving the same level of benefits as those who could afford them. Insulin, MRI Testing, Physical Therapy, Chiropractic care need to be restored. I am firmly in favor of restoring Medicare benefits with the inclusion of coverage for eye glasses, hearing aid devices and dentures. A remnant of the Obama Administration, US Healthcare, is costing American taxpayers a considerable amount of money as it is state subsidized while subscribers receive a tax credit. US Healthcare also necessitates an escrow of over $1 trilion based upon actuarial tables for the purpose of covering - originally- 30 million Americans. US Healthcare now has a subscriber base of under 8 million, without ever having reached more than 12 million subscribers. Both Democrats and Republicans in the House and the Senate have stated that US Healthcare is broken. However, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Enhancement HR 1425 passed the House 230-180 on June 25, 2020. HR1425 funds US Healthcare with additional state subsidies that will be used, in part, for marketing and sales of US Healthcare. Recall that US Healthcare was built with marketing efforts by the Obama Administration, funded by taxpayer dollars. I oppose spending taxpayer dollars for the purpose of further funding the marketing of US Healthcare. I also oppose spending for the purpose of adding to state subsidies that would provide monthly insurance rate cuts. We have a private insurance industry that has been crippled in having to compete with American taxpayer dollars subsidizing tax credits and state subsidies that lower subscriber's monthly costs. This bill will also limit pharmaceutical makers in their profitability and will thus will curtail medical advancement and medical technology going forward. Our medical industry is the envy of the world. While HR 1425 targets the pharmaceutical industry, it doesn't mention pharmaceutical retailers- the true culprit. Instead, HR 1425 targets research and development of our biotechnology/pharmaceutical industry by making all pharmaceuticals subject to price controls whether they're new to market or not. Let's get back to the garden.
Here's a Plan --Limit retail mark-up of prescriptions to no more than triple the wholesale cost. Typical retail mark-ups range in the 2-3 times wholesale range. Clearly, the retail market has been taking advantage of the necessity of such items, that, being prescribed by their doctor, are necessary to their health. The Federal Trade Commission Act of 1914 allows Congress to act in the event that there is a crisis in cost to consumers in a given industry due to monopolistic practices. The concept of monopoly exists, in that, drug companies are protected by patents. However, the concept of necessity also makes for a monopolistic situation with regard to a prescription. --Open global markets to pharmaceutical companies. While President Trump brought fairness to pharmaceutical pricing, as prices of a given drug must now be the same for all, those prices may be excluding the US from world markets. Since 2017, China and Syria both responded that US pharmaceuticals are too expensive. --55 Pharmaceutical Patents will expire between now and 2022 making the inclusion of generic drug companies into the supply side of this equation a factor. Federal lawmakers can work to foster the development of generic pharmaceutical companies who will be receptive to providing pharmaceuticals at a significantly lower cost to retailers. --Restore Medicaid/Medicare- It is imperative that all Americans have access to descent health care. Those who are poor need it the most. --close US Healthcare- I believe that, in hindsight, lawmakers will look back on the number of years and the amount of money spent on US Healthcare and admit to it being a mistake. Why? US Healthcare is not actually available to all Americans. Regions of the country are devoid of access to US Healthcare for Americans as there are no doctors who are providing access to the coverage in a given locale. US Healthcare is costly to American taxpayers and hurts private insurers. The private insurance industry, at present has to compete with a tax credit and subsidized costs to rate payers. The arrangement is a grossly unfair business practice on the part of the US Federal government. We are competing with a private industry with taxpayer dollars and we shouldn't be doing that. Letting US Healthcare drift to its conclusion may only take a few years, without taxpayer money being spent on marketing or additional subsidies. I prefer to see it close and incorporate subscribers into a restored Medicaid/Medicare system. **The debate in the US House of Representatives regarding HR1425 includes arguments from Republican Congressman to reduce pricing by pharmaceutical retailers, such as Walgreens and Walmart. The numbers and the cost savings were included, but to no avail. House Democrats insist on their platform, even though the answer is staring them in the face. This Republican in the House would help.
The key to the health care crisis is lower costs. Lower costs relating to prescriptions will alleviate 7/8ths of Medicare/Medicaid disbursements, an indicator for the industry as a whole. Prescriptions dispensed 2018 cost $4.21 billion, while personal retail expenditures for the same year were$335 billion, the difference paid by health care insurers and consumers. Whose hiking the costs? Retailers like Walgreens, Walmart and many more that purchase pharmaceuticals wholesale and sell to the general public via prescription- retail with the up-charge costing health care insurers and Americans hundreds of billions of dollars. Striking at pharmaceutical companies for their wares is a top priority in Washington. The dialog, however, has yet to include the pharmaceutical retail industry that is responsible for the vast majority of excessive pricing- the root of a health care crisis, as dubbed by many lawmakers. With many pharmaceuticals having been available for years and dozens losing their patent protection within the next two years, pharmaceutical companies may fair game for generic manufacturers in the near term. As lawmakers seek to dramatically reduce costs to health care insurers and begin the process of opening world markets, two venues may be just what the doctor ordered. -- Limit mark-up pricing at the retail level. In looking at the numbers for 2018 pricing advanced 7960% from wholesale to retail. Limiting markup to a reasonable level can immediately eliminate the necessary spending of over 300 billion a year by health care insurers and Americans -- Open the doors for generic manufacturing. Let's get this show on the road. Mylan Labs is one generic pharmaceutical manufacturer that has a longstanding reputation in the industry. Barriers to entry may certainly exist that deny entry to worthy competitors. --Pharmaceutical companies need to be in the loop. The United States leads the world in medical advancement and pharmaceuticals. We need to communicate with these companies, discover their true concerns and work to build foreign markets. However, costs aren't the only problem. Medicare recipients lost necessary coverage in 2010 due to President Obama's initiative to build US Healthcare with the exclusion of those impoverished from receiving the same level of benefits as those who could afford them. Insulin, MRI Testing, Physical Therapy, Chiropractic care need to be restored. I am firmly in favor of restoring Medicare benefits with the inclusion of coverage for eye glasses, hearing aid devices and dentures. A remnant of the Obama Administration, US Healthcare, is costing American taxpayers a considerable amount of money as it is state subsidized while subscribers receive a tax credit. US Healthcare also necessitates an escrow of over $1 trilion based upon actuarial tables for the purpose of covering - originally- 30 million Americans. US Healthcare now has a subscriber base of under 8 million, without ever having reached more than 12 million subscribers. Both Democrats and Republicans in the House and the Senate have stated that US Healthcare is broken. However, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Enhancement HR 1425 passed the House 230-180 on June 25, 2020. HR1425 funds US Healthcare with additional state subsidies that will be used, in part, for marketing and sales of US Healthcare. Recall that US Healthcare was built with marketing efforts by the Obama Administration, funded by taxpayer dollars. I oppose spending taxpayer dollars for the purpose of further funding the marketing of US Healthcare. I also oppose spending for the purpose of adding to state subsidies that would provide monthly insurance rate cuts. We have a private insurance industry that has been crippled in having to compete with American taxpayer dollars subsidizing tax credits and state subsidies that lower subscriber's monthly costs. This bill will also limit pharmaceutical makers in their profitability and will thus will curtail medical advancement and medical technology going forward. Our medical industry is the envy of the world. While HR 1425 targets the pharmaceutical industry, it doesn't mention pharmaceutical retailers- the true culprit. Instead, HR 1425 targets research and development of our biotechnology/pharmaceutical industry by making all pharmaceuticals subject to price controls whether they're new to market or not. Let's get back to the garden.
Here's a Plan --Limit retail mark-up of prescriptions to no more than triple the wholesale cost. Typical retail mark-ups range in the 2-3 times wholesale range. Clearly, the retail market has been taking advantage of the necessity of such items, that, being prescribed by their doctor, are necessary to their health. The Federal Trade Commission Act of 1914 allows Congress to act in the event that there is a crisis in cost to consumers in a given industry due to monopolistic practices. The concept of monopoly exists, in that, drug companies are protected by patents. However, the concept of necessity also makes for a monopolistic situation with regard to a prescription. --Open global markets to pharmaceutical companies. While President Trump brought fairness to pharmaceutical pricing, as prices of a given drug must now be the same for all, those prices may be excluding the US from world markets. Since 2017, China and Syria both responded that US pharmaceuticals are too expensive. --55 Pharmaceutical Patents will expire between now and 2022 making the inclusion of generic drug companies into the supply side of this equation a factor. Federal lawmakers can work to foster the development of generic pharmaceutical companies who will be receptive to providing pharmaceuticals at a significantly lower cost to retailers. --Restore Medicaid/Medicare- It is imperative that all Americans have access to descent health care. Those who are poor need it the most. --close US Healthcare- I believe that, in hindsight, lawmakers will look back on the number of years and the amount of money spent on US Healthcare and admit to it being a mistake. Why? US Healthcare is not actually available to all Americans. Regions of the country are devoid of access to US Healthcare for Americans as there are no doctors who are providing access to the coverage in a given locale. US Healthcare is costly to American taxpayers and hurts private insurers. The private insurance industry, at present has to compete with a tax credit and subsidized costs to rate payers. The arrangement is a grossly unfair business practice on the part of the US Federal government. We are competing with a private industry with taxpayer dollars and we shouldn't be doing that. Letting US Healthcare drift to its conclusion may only take a few years, without taxpayer money being spent on marketing or additional subsidies. I prefer to see it close and incorporate subscribers into a restored Medicaid/Medicare system. **The debate in the US House of Representatives regarding HR1425 includes arguments from Republican Congressman to reduce pricing by pharmaceutical retailers, such as Walgreens and Walmart. The numbers and the cost savings were included, but to no avail. House Democrats insist on their platform, even though the answer is staring them in the face. This Republican in the House would help.
The key to the health care crisis is lower costs. Lower costs relating to prescriptions will alleviate 7/8ths of Medicare/Medicaid disbursements, an indicator for the industry as a whole. Prescriptions dispensed 2018 cost $4.21 billion, while personal retail expenditures for the same year were$335 billion, the difference paid by health care insurers and consumers. Whose hiking the costs? Retailers like Walgreens, Walmart and many more that purchase pharmaceuticals wholesale and sell to the general public via prescription- retail with the up-charge costing health care insurers and Americans hundreds of billions of dollars. Striking at pharmaceutical companies for their wares is a top priority in Washington. The dialog, however, has yet to include the pharmaceutical retail industry that is responsible for the vast majority of excessive pricing- the root of a health care crisis, as dubbed by many lawmakers. With many pharmaceuticals having been available for years and dozens losing their patent protection within the next two years, pharmaceutical companies may fair game for generic manufacturers in the near term. As lawmakers seek to dramatically reduce costs to health care insurers and begin the process of opening world markets, two venues may be just what the doctor ordered. -- Limit mark-up pricing at the retail level. In looking at the numbers for 2018 pricing advanced 7960% from wholesale to retail. Limiting markup to a reasonable level can immediately eliminate the necessary spending of over 300 billion a year by health care insurers and Americans -- Open the doors for generic manufacturing. Let's get this show on the road. Mylan Labs is one generic pharmaceutical manufacturer that has a longstanding reputation in the industry. Barriers to entry may certainly exist that deny entry to worthy competitors. --Pharmaceutical companies need to be in the loop. The United States leads the world in medical advancement and pharmaceuticals. We need to communicate with these companies, discover their true concerns and work to build foreign markets. However, costs aren't the only problem. Medicare recipients lost necessary coverage in 2010 due to President Obama's initiative to build US Healthcare with the exclusion of those impoverished from receiving the same level of benefits as those who could afford them. Insulin, MRI Testing, Physical Therapy, Chiropractic care need to be restored. I am firmly in favor of restoring Medicare benefits with the inclusion of coverage for eye glasses, hearing aid devices and dentures. A remnant of the Obama Administration, US Healthcare, is costing American taxpayers a considerable amount of money as it is state subsidized while subscribers receive a tax credit. US Healthcare also necessitates an escrow of over $1 trilion based upon actuarial tables for the purpose of covering - originally- 30 million Americans. US Healthcare now has a subscriber base of under 8 million, without ever having reached more than 12 million subscribers. Both Democrats and Republicans in the House and the Senate have stated that US Healthcare is broken. However, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Enhancement HR 1425 passed the House 230-180 on June 25, 2020. HR1425 funds US Healthcare with additional state subsidies that will be used, in part, for marketing and sales of US Healthcare. Recall that US Healthcare was built with marketing efforts by the Obama Administration, funded by taxpayer dollars. I oppose spending taxpayer dollars for the purpose of further funding the marketing of US Healthcare. I also oppose spending for the purpose of adding to state subsidies that would provide monthly insurance rate cuts. We have a private insurance industry that has been crippled in having to compete with American taxpayer dollars subsidizing tax credits and state subsidies that lower subscriber's monthly costs. This bill will also limit pharmaceutical makers in their profitability and will thus will curtail medical advancement and medical technology going forward. Our medical industry is the envy of the world. While HR 1425 targets the pharmaceutical industry, it doesn't mention pharmaceutical retailers- the true culprit. Instead, HR 1425 targets research and development of our biotechnology/pharmaceutical industry by making all pharmaceuticals subject to price controls whether they're new to market or not. Let's get back to the garden.
Here's a Plan --Limit retail mark-up of prescriptions to no more than triple the wholesale cost. Typical retail mark-ups range in the 2-3 times wholesale range. Clearly, the retail market has been taking advantage of the necessity of such items, that, being prescribed by their doctor, are necessary to their health. The Federal Trade Commission Act of 1914 allows Congress to act in the event that there is a crisis in cost to consumers in a given industry due to monopolistic practices. The concept of monopoly exists, in that, drug companies are protected by patents. However, the concept of necessity also makes for a monopolistic situation with regard to a prescription. --Open global markets to pharmaceutical companies. While President Trump brought fairness to pharmaceutical pricing, as prices of a given drug must now be the same for all, those prices may be excluding the US from world markets. Since 2017, China and Syria both responded that US pharmaceuticals are too expensive. --55 Pharmaceutical Patents will expire between now and 2022 making the inclusion of generic drug companies into the supply side of this equation a factor. Federal lawmakers can work to foster the development of generic pharmaceutical companies who will be receptive to providing pharmaceuticals at a significantly lower cost to retailers. --Restore Medicaid/Medicare- It is imperative that all Americans have access to descent health care. Those who are poor need it the most. --close US Healthcare- I believe that, in hindsight, lawmakers will look back on the number of years and the amount of money spent on US Healthcare and admit to it being a mistake. Why? US Healthcare is not actually available to all Americans. Regions of the country are devoid of access to US Healthcare for Americans as there are no doctors who are providing access to the coverage in a given locale. US Healthcare is costly to American taxpayers and hurts private insurers. The private insurance industry, at present has to compete with a tax credit and subsidized costs to rate payers. The arrangement is a grossly unfair business practice on the part of the US Federal government. We are competing with a private industry with taxpayer dollars and we shouldn't be doing that. Letting US Healthcare drift to its conclusion may only take a few years, without taxpayer money being spent on marketing or additional subsidies. I prefer to see it close and incorporate subscribers into a restored Medicaid/Medicare system. **The debate in the US House of Representatives regarding HR1425 includes arguments from Republican Congressman to reduce pricing by pharmaceutical retailers, such as Walgreens and Walmart. The numbers and the cost savings were included, but to no avail. House Democrats insist on their platform, even though the answer is staring them in the face. This Republican in the House would help.