With world life expectancy on the rise, the US ranks 46th among all nations with 79.11 years as its average annual lifespan for 2019, according to the United Nations Population Division. The CDC estimates the average life expectancy for Americans at a lower level, 78.6 years, for the same year. Though this country is either near or at the top of the charts in categories such as average income, wealth, standard of living, literacy, education, and housing conditions, concerning longevity- we have a ways to go. Who's number one? Hone Kong, with an average life expectancy of 85.29 years. Women, in fact, across the globe are living longer than men. Women in Hong Kong have the highest life expectancy for the gender of any in the world, trucking on until an average age of 88.17 years. Men in Hong Kong have an average life expectancy of 82.38 years. Japan is second, with an average life expectancy of men and women combined of 85.03, Switzerland (a Democracy) is fourth with 84.25 years, Italy (also a Democracy) 84.01 years, Spain (socialist) 83.99 years. Israel 83.49 years, France 83.13 years, Canada 82.96 years, and the United Kingdom 81.77 years, just to name a few, according to the United Nations. There are very low numbers as well. The shortest life expectancy for a gender of any county in the world is 52.16 average years, referencing men in the Central African Republic. In fact, throughout Africa, most average life expectancies range from the mid fifties to the mid sixties owing to starvation, living conditions and illiteracy. Why does the United States trail industrialized nations in life expectancy by as much as 6 years? Nuclear fallout from live nuclear tests performed by United States, many on US soil, may be part of the reason why. Remember Bikini Atol, Marshall Islands, March, 1954? On March 1, 1954, the United States purposely detonated a hydrogen bomb on the island of Bikini Atol, Marshall Islands. The nuclear test sent nuclear fallout into the air that was carried by weather patterns to the United States, where it landed. Nuclear fallout from nuclear testing was later linked to Leukemia and thyroid cancer in the United States. Live nuclear tests have been performed by the United States on the Marshall Islands and various parts of mainland US from 1947 until 1992, with a four year hiatus from 1958 until 1961. The largest level of nuclear fallout that has ever materialized on US soil was the result of the nuclear test "Storax Sedan" on July 6, 1962 at Area 10, Nevada National Security Site, NV. The test was conducted underground for the purpose of discovering the use of nuclear weapons for peaceful purposes, such as mining. The blast sent 880,000 curries of Iodine 131 into the atmosphere. The biggest man-made crater in the United States was generated measuring 12 meters. In Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota and Illinois, millions of people were exposed to radiation as a result of the blast.
Meanwhile, the number one killer in the United States is heart disease. 655,381 lives were lost to heart disease in 2018. Number two is cancer. The category includes all types of cancer, including Leukemia and Thyroid cancer that are both directly linked to radiation contact. 599,274 persons died of cancer in 2018. Accidents and unintentional injuries were number three for the year with 167,127 persons deceased. Chronic lower respiratory diseases were number four; Cerebrovascular diseases number five, Alzheimer disease number six, and Diabetes number was seven. In 2018 deaths by drug overdose dropped 4.6% from 2017 to 67,367, making the cause of death number eight, if it were counted by the CDC as being within the top ten. The CDC does not post deaths by drug overdose within the top 10, even though the numbers would place them there. The stats post Influenza and pneumonia as number eight for the year with a loss of life totaling 59,120. Why has the CDC decided to drop deaths by drug overdose in their posting of the top 10 causes of death in the US when the number of those lives that were lost would place drug overdose in the listing? I don't know. CNN recently reported that deaths by drug overdose reached a record level of 70,980 for 2019.
Infographic: U.S. Life Expectancy Rises | Statista You will find more infographics at Statista

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World Health Rankings - Interactive Map of Countries and Causes of Death
What it is that people die of around the world varies considerably from country to country. In some cases, I've found interesting comparisons in industrialized nations verses underdeveloped countries, and, at times, not what I expected. I found the following information from the World Health Organization for 2018. The numbers pertaining to the loss of life due to alcohol or drug use may be the result of several factors, such as the availability of alcohol or drugs. Of the cross section of the countries that I compared, I found a considerable difference between Russia- with 14.54 deaths per 100,000 due to alcohol and 10.72 deaths per 100,000 due to drug use verses China's .81 per 100,000/Alcohol and 1.84 per 100,000/drug use. Note that both countries are similar in the political and economic framework and exist on the same continent. While people in China clearly do not drink or use drugs in excess, a comparison of the loss of life in Russia, the US and China from Liver Cancer is elliptical to the loss of life from alcohol/drug use. 23.63 persons died of liver cancer during 2018 in China, verses Russia 4.96 and the United States 5.22. The numbers for liver disease for 2018; Russia 20.83, China 8.44 and US 10.69, are consistent with the numbers related to drug and alcohol use. 2.6 persons out of 100,000 are deceased as a result of alcohol and 10.81 per 100,000 from drug use in the United States. Alzheimers/Dementia is prevalent in many countries, including the United States, the United Kingdom, China, as well as Namibia and South Africa, who post mortality due to the disease is between 30 and 37 per 100,000. Russia, Germany, Mongolia, and Brazil show markedly lower numbers for the category, ranging between 10 and 20. The loss of life due to Asthma varies considerably from the United States, United Kingdom, Russia, China, Germany and others whose numbers range between .6 and 1.5 per 100,000, verses South Africa, Namibia, Mali and other African nations who loose as many as 23 persons per 100,000 over the same time frame. The loss of life in India due to asthma is also considerably higher than other industrialized nations at 16.77. Lack of medical devices and care is very likely the reason for the anomaly, as persons who dwell in industrialized nations tend to have further contact with air pollution and are, in fact, experiencing far fewer incidents of death due to the condition. I’ve found that China and Mongolia and some other countries are relatively unscathed by the certain types of cancers, including breast cancer, Uterin and Prostate Cancer. Concerning breast cancer, Russia, the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany and a number of African countries have similar numbers posting between 17 and 23 deaths per 100,000 while China and Mongolia experience a loss of life less than 6 per 100,000 for the disease. The impact of live nuclear testing in the United States and Russia could account for most of the phenomenon. Pollution, lack of available clean water or sanitation may account for the elevated numbers in the Central African Republic and other African Nations. African nations post relatively high numbers for Cervical Cancer; Tanzania 35.6, Mali 33.23, South Africa 18.31 verses the United States 3.21 and Germany 1.91 as well as Russia 6.35 and China 3.31. The positive impact of preventative care, periodic examinations, as well as regular access to home facilities for person hygiene in developed countries verses the living conditions in underdeveloped nations may be a contributing factor. Stomach cancer and cancer of the Esophagus tell a different story. The United States and Russia both post between 3 and 4 deaths per hundred thousand for Esophagus Cancer while China and Mongolia post 11.51 and 19.47, respectively. For stomach cancer, the United States shows a relatively low incidence with 2.56 per 100,000 verses Russia- 17.13, China- 18.56, Mongolia- 29.12. African nations are also little scathed by the disease with relatively low numbers; South Africa 3.76, Namibia 1.85 and Central African Republic 2.87. Could the pollution in China be taking its toll on its own people by way of stomach cancer and cancer of the esophagus? There are many interesting comparisons. I believe that food and water quality standards and pollution are contributing factors, as well as the impact of nuclear fallout from tests performed by the US and Russia, along with poverty and inhumane living conditions. Accurate reporting also influences the numbers that we're shown. Consider the WHO reports for victims of drowning for 2018. 11.18 persons per 100,000 died of drowning in Chad, a landlocked country with a terrain of mostly desert, verses the United States, that reported 1.42 per 100,000. In fact, African countries in general posted substantially higher numbers for a loss of life due to drownings than the remainder of the world. What can we do to help? 1. Let's clean up the mess. Radioactive nuclides exist on US soil that should be removed. How? We do not yet have the answer as to how to clean up radioactive residue, other than to bulldoze it and bury it. We need to find a better way. I feel that the federal government and Congress should act to foster the research and development to find these answers as a top priority. The work will prepare us for nuclear confrontation. We need to be able to remove the impact of nuclear attack. The ability to do so will help the US maintain its place as superpower and world leader and will likely act as a deterrent to such events as nuclear confrontation. Decades of air pollution, plastic piled in oceans, polluted waterways and soils in many countries in Asia are a cause of severe harm to our planet and ourselves. Other countries have not kept to the same standards as the US and they need our help. Let's help find them a way to clean up the mess. 2. Let's fight world poverty, as well as illiteracy and a lack of infrastructure in underdeveloped nations. While many of those countries are in Africa, others are located in Asia and other parts of the world. Extending a helping hand will help open new markets and assist so many people around the world with regard to their quality of life, as well as their longevity. 3. Let's improve conditions in the United States through public awareness. Remember the Just Say No program? It was a legacy of Nancy Reagan and was extremely successful, along with DARE in curtailing drug use, including marijuana and heroin use. The numbers fell dramatically from 1978 to 1993. Ironically, both programs were briefly unfunded due to their success. DARE was revised and reinstated. Just Say No was no more. Let's bring it back. Obesity continues to be a problem in this country. I also found that obesity exists in China, and around the world. Let's work towards progress with knowledge. An awareness campaign can make a considerable difference. Any ideas? I would be very happy to hear them. Please feel free to contact me.
Statistic: Life expectancy (from birth) in the United States, from 1860 to 2020* | Statista
Find more statistics at Statista

World Health and Causes of Death:

A Comparative Glance

World Life Expectancy by Gender and Country- World Meters Info CDC Reports Drug Overdose Deaths in 2018 CNN Reports Deaths from Drug Overdose Reach an All Time High for 2019 at 70,980 CTBTO- The United States Nuclear Testing Programme
With world life expectancy on the rise, the US ranks 46th among all nations with 79.11 years as its average annual lifespan for 2019, according to the United Nations Population Division. The CDC estimates the average life expectancy for Americans at a lower level, 78.6 years, for the same year. Though this country is either near or at the top of the charts in categories such as average income, wealth, standard of living, literacy, education, and housing conditions, concerning longevity- we have a ways to go. Who's number one? Hone Kong, with an average life expectancy of 85.29 years. Women, in fact, across the globe are living longer than men. Women in Hong Kong have the highest life expectancy for the gender of any in the world, trucking on until an average age of 88.17 years. Men in Hong Kong have an average life expectancy of 82.38 years. Japan is second, with an average life expectancy of men and women combined of 85.03, Switzerland (a Democracy) is fourth with 84.25 years, Italy (also a Democracy) 84.01 years, Spain (socialist) 83.99 years. Israel 83.49 years, France 83.13 years, Canada 82.96 years, and the United Kingdom 81.77 years, just to name a few, according to the United Nations. There are very low numbers as well. The shortest life expectancy for a gender of any county in the world is 52.16 average years, referencing men in the Central African Republic. In fact, throughout Africa, most average life expectancies range from the mid fifties to the mid sixties owing to starvation, living conditions and illiteracy. Why does the United States trail industrialized nations in life expectancy by as much as 6 years? Nuclear fallout from live nuclear tests performed by United States, many on US soil, may be part of the reason why. Remember Bikini Atol, Marshall Islands, March, 1954? On March 1, 1954, the United States purposely detonated a hydrogen bomb on the island of Bikini Atol, Marshall Islands. The nuclear test sent nuclear fallout into the air that was carried by weather patterns to the United States, where it landed. Nuclear fallout from nuclear testing was later linked to Leukemia and thyroid cancer in the United States. Live nuclear tests have been performed by the United States on the Marshall Islands and various parts of mainland US from 1947 until 1992, with a four year hiatus from 1958 until 1961. The largest level of nuclear fallout that has ever materialized on US soil was the result of the nuclear test "Storax Sedan" on July 6, 1962 at Area 10, Nevada National Security Site, NV. The test was conducted underground for the purpose of discovering the use of nuclear weapons for peaceful purposes, such as mining. The blast sent 880,000 curries of Iodine 131 into the atmosphere. The biggest man-made crater in the United States was generated measuring 12 meters. In Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota and Illinois, millions of people were exposed to radiation as a result of the blast.
Meanwhile, the number one killer in the United States is heart disease. 655,381 lives were lost to heart disease in 2018. Number two is cancer. The category includes all types of cancer, including Leukemia and Thyroid cancer that are both directly linked to radiation contact. 599,274 persons died of cancer in 2018. Accidents and unintentional injuries were number three for the year with 167,127 persons deceased. Chronic lower respiratory diseases were number four; Cerebrovascular diseases number five, Alzheimer disease number six, and Diabetes number was seven. In 2018 deaths by drug overdose dropped 4.6% from 2017 to 67,367, making the cause of death number eight, if it were counted by the CDC as being within the top ten. The CDC does not post deaths by drug overdose within the top 10, even though the numbers would place them there. The stats post Influenza and pneumonia as number eight for the year with a loss of life totaling 59,120. Why has the CDC decided to drop deaths by drug overdose in their posting of the top 10 causes of death in the US when the number of those lives that were lost would place drug overdose in the listing? I don't know. CNN recently reported that deaths by drug overdose reached a record level of 70,980 for 2019. World Health Rankings - Interactive Map of Countries and Causes of Death
What it is that people die of around the world varies considerably from country to country. In some cases, I've found interesting comparisons in industrialized nations verses underdeveloped countries, and, at times, not what I expected. I found the following information from the World Health Organization for 2018. The numbers pertaining to the loss of life due to alcohol or drug use may be the result of several factors, such as the availability of alcohol or drugs. Of the cross section of the countries that I compared, I found a considerable difference between Russia- with 14.54 deaths per 100,000 due to alcohol and 10.72 deaths per 100,000 due to drug use verses China's .81 per 100,000/Alcohol and 1.84 per 100,000/drug use. Note that both countries are similar in the political and economic framework and exist on the same continent. While people in China clearly do not drink or use drugs in excess, a comparison of the loss of life in Russia, the US and China from Liver Cancer is elliptical to the loss of life from alcohol/drug use. 23.63 persons died of liver cancer during 2018 in China, verses Russia 4.96 and the United States 5.22. The numbers for liver disease for 2018; Russia 20.83, China 8.44 and US 10.69, are consistent with the numbers related to drug and alcohol use. 2.6 persons out of 100,000 are deceased as a result of alcohol and 10.81 per 100,000 from drug use in the United States. Alzheimers/Dementia is prevalent in many countries, including the United States, the United Kingdom, China, as well as Namibia and South Africa, who post mortality due to the disease is between 30 and 37 per 100,000. Russia, Germany, Mongolia, and Brazil show markedly lower numbers for the category, ranging between 10 and 20. The loss of life due to Asthma varies considerably from the United States, United Kingdom, Russia, China, Germany and others whose numbers range between .6 and 1.5 per 100,000, verses South Africa, Namibia, Mali and other African nations who loose as many as 23 persons per 100,000 over the same time frame. The loss of life in India due to asthma is also considerably higher than other industrialized nations at 16.77. Lack of medical devices and care is very likely the reason for the anomaly, as persons who dwell in industrialized nations tend to have further contact with air pollution and are, in fact, experiencing far fewer incidents of death due to the condition. I’ve found that China and Mongolia and some other countries are relatively unscathed by the certain types of cancers, including breast cancer, Uterin and Prostate Cancer. Concerning breast cancer, Russia, the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany and a number of African countries have similar numbers posting between 17 and 23 deaths per 100,000 while China and Mongolia experience a loss of life less than 6 per 100,000 for the disease. The impact of live nuclear testing in the United States and Russia could account for most of the phenomenon. Pollution, lack of available clean water or sanitation may account for the elevated numbers in the Central African Republic and other African Nations. African nations post relatively high numbers for Cervical Cancer; Tanzania 35.6, Mali 33.23, South Africa 18.31 verses the United States 3.21 and Germany 1.91 as well as Russia 6.35 and China 3.31. The positive impact of preventative care, periodic examinations, as well as regular access to home facilities for person hygiene in developed countries verses the living conditions in underdeveloped nations may be a contributing factor. Stomach cancer and cancer of the Esophagus tell a different story. The United States and Russia both post between 3 and 4 deaths per hundred thousand for Esophagus Cancer while China and Mongolia post 11.51 and 19.47, respectively. For stomach cancer, the United States shows a relatively low incidence with 2.56 per 100,000 verses Russia- 17.13, China- 18.56, Mongolia- 29.12. African nations are also little scathed by the disease with relatively low numbers; South Africa 3.76, Namibia 1.85 and Central African Republic 2.87. Could the pollution in China be taking its toll on its own people by way of stomach cancer and cancer of the esophagus? There are many interesting comparisons. I believe that food and water quality standards and pollution are contributing factors, as well as the impact of nuclear fallout from tests performed by the US and Russia, along with poverty and inhumane living conditions. Accurate reporting also influences the numbers that we're shown. Consider the WHO reports for victims of drowning for 2018. 11.18 persons per 100,000 died of drowning in Chad, a landlocked country with a terrain of mostly desert, verses the United States, that reported 1.42 per 100,000. In fact, African countries in general posted substantially higher numbers for a loss of life due to drownings than the remainder of the world. What can we do to help? 1. Let's clean up the mess. Radioactive nuclides exist on US soil that should be removed. How? We do not yet have the answer as to how to clean up radioactive residue, other than to bulldoze it and bury it. We need to find a better way. I feel that the federal government and Congress should act to foster the research and development to find these answers as a top priority. The work will prepare us for nuclear confrontation. We need to be able to remove the impact of nuclear attack. The ability to do so will help the US maintain its place as superpower and world leader and will likely act as a deterrent to such events as nuclear confrontation. Decades of air pollution, plastic piled in oceans, polluted waterways and soils in many countries in Asia are a cause of severe harm to our planet and ourselves. Other countries have not kept to the same standards as the US and they need our help. Let's help find them a way to clean up the mess. 2. Let's fight world poverty, as well as illiteracy and a lack of infrastructure in underdeveloped nations. While many of those countries are in Africa, others are located in Asia and other parts of the world. Extending a helping hand will help open new markets and assist so many people around the world with regard to their quality of life, as well as their longevity. 3. Let's improve conditions in the United States through public awareness. Remember the Just Say No program? It was a legacy of Nancy Reagan and was extremely successful, along with DARE in curtailing drug use, including marijuana and heroin use. The numbers fell dramatically from 1978 to 1993. Ironically, both programs were briefly unfunded due to their success. DARE was revised and reinstated. Just Say No was no more. Let's bring it back. Obesity continues to be a problem in this country. I also found that obesity exists in China, and around the world. Let's work towards progress with knowledge. An awareness campaign can make a considerable difference. Any ideas? I would be very happy to hear them. Please feel free to contact me.
With world life expectancy on the rise, the US ranks 46th among all nations with 79.11 years as its average annual lifespan for 2019, according to the United Nations Population Division. The CDC estimates the average life expectancy for Americans at a lower level, 78.6 years, for the same year. Though this country is either near or at the top of the charts in categories such as average income, wealth, standard of living, literacy, education, and housing conditions, concerning longevity- we have a ways to go. Who's number one? Hone Kong, with an average life expectancy of 85.29 years. Women, in fact, across the globe are living longer than men. Women in Hong Kong have the highest life expectancy for the gender of any in the world, trucking on until an average age of 88.17 years. Men in Hong Kong have an average life expectancy of 82.38 years. Japan is second, with an average life expectancy of men and women combined of 85.03, Switzerland (a Democracy) is fourth with 84.25 years, Italy (also a Democracy) 84.01 years, Spain (socialist) 83.99 years. Israel 83.49 years, France 83.13 years, Canada 82.96 years, and the United Kingdom 81.77 years, just to name a few, according to the United Nations. There are very low numbers as well. The shortest life expectancy for a gender of any county in the world is 52.16 average years, referencing men in the Central African Republic. In fact, throughout Africa, most average life expectancies range from the mid fifties to the mid sixties owing to starvation, living conditions and illiteracy. Why does the United States trail industrialized nations in life expectancy by as much as 6 years? Nuclear fallout from live nuclear tests performed by United States, many on US soil, may be part of the reason why. Remember Bikini Atol, Marshall Islands, March, 1954? On March 1, 1954, the United States purposely detonated a hydrogen bomb on the island of Bikini Atol, Marshall Islands. The nuclear test sent nuclear fallout into the air that was carried by weather patterns to the United States, where it landed. Nuclear fallout from nuclear testing was later linked to Leukemia and thyroid cancer in the United States. Live nuclear tests have been performed by the United States on the Marshall Islands and various parts of mainland US from 1947 until 1992, with a four year hiatus from 1958 until 1961. The largest level of nuclear fallout that has ever materialized on US soil was the result of the nuclear test "Storax Sedan" on July 6, 1962 at Area 10, Nevada National Security Site, NV. The test was conducted underground for the purpose of discovering the use of nuclear weapons for peaceful purposes, such as mining. The blast sent 880,000 curries of Iodine 131 into the atmosphere. The biggest man-made crater in the United States was generated measuring 12 meters. In Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota and Illinois, millions of people were exposed to radiation as a result of the blast.
Meanwhile, the number one killer in the United States is heart disease. 655,381 lives were lost to heart disease in 2018. Number two is cancer. The category includes all types of cancer, including Leukemia and Thyroid cancer that are both directly linked to radiation contact. 599,274 persons died of cancer in 2018. Accidents and unintentional injuries were number three for the year with 167,127 persons deceased. Chronic lower respiratory diseases were number four; Cerebrovascular diseases number five, Alzheimer disease number six, and Diabetes number was seven. In 2018 deaths by drug overdose dropped 4.6% from 2017 to 67,367, making the cause of death number eight, if it were counted by the CDC as being within the top ten. The CDC does not post deaths by drug overdose within the top 10, even though the numbers would place them there. The stats post Influenza and pneumonia as number eight for the year with a loss of life totaling 59,120. Why has the CDC decided to drop deaths by drug overdose in their posting of the top 10 causes of death in the US when the number of those lives that were lost would place drug overdose in the listing? I don't know. CNN recently reported that deaths by drug overdose reached a record level of 70,980 for 2019. World Health Rankings - Interactive Map of Countries and Causes of Death
What it is that people die of around the world varies considerably from country to country. In some cases, I've found interesting comparisons in industrialized nations verses underdeveloped countries, and, at times, not what I expected. I found the following information from the World Health Organization for 2018. The numbers pertaining to the loss of life due to alcohol or drug use may be the result of several factors, such as the availability of alcohol or drugs. Of the cross section of the countries that I compared, I found a considerable difference between Russia- with 14.54 deaths per 100,000 due to alcohol and 10.72 deaths per 100,000 due to drug use verses China's .81 per 100,000/Alcohol and 1.84 per 100,000/drug use. Note that both countries are similar in the political and economic framework and exist on the same continent. While people in China clearly do not drink or use drugs in excess, a comparison of the loss of life in Russia, the US and China from Liver Cancer is elliptical to the loss of life from alcohol/drug use. 23.63 persons died of liver cancer during 2018 in China, verses Russia 4.96 and the United States 5.22. The numbers for liver disease for 2018; Russia 20.83, China 8.44 and US 10.69, are consistent with the numbers related to drug and alcohol use. 2.6 persons out of 100,000 are deceased as a result of alcohol and 10.81 per 100,000 from drug use in the United States. Alzheimers/Dementia is prevalent in many countries, including the United States, the United Kingdom, China, as well as Namibia and South Africa, who post mortality due to the disease is between 30 and 37 per 100,000. Russia, Germany, Mongolia, and Brazil show markedly lower numbers for the category, ranging between 10 and 20. The loss of life due to Asthma varies considerably from the United States, United Kingdom, Russia, China, Germany and others whose numbers range between .6 and 1.5 per 100,000, verses South Africa, Namibia, Mali and other African nations who loose as many as 23 persons per 100,000 over the same time frame. The loss of life in India due to asthma is also considerably higher than other industrialized nations at 16.77. Lack of medical devices and care is very likely the reason for the anomaly, as persons who dwell in industrialized nations tend to have further contact with air pollution and are, in fact, experiencing far fewer incidents of death due to the condition. I’ve found that China and Mongolia and some other countries are relatively unscathed by the certain types of cancers, including breast cancer, Uterin and Prostate Cancer. Concerning breast cancer, Russia, the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany and a number of African countries have similar numbers posting between 17 and 23 deaths per 100,000 while China and Mongolia experience a loss of life less than 6 per 100,000 for the disease. The impact of live nuclear testing in the United States and Russia could account for most of the phenomenon. Pollution, lack of available clean water or sanitation may account for the elevated numbers in the Central African Republic and other African Nations. African nations post relatively high numbers for Cervical Cancer; Tanzania 35.6, Mali 33.23, South Africa 18.31 verses the United States 3.21 and Germany 1.91 as well as Russia 6.35 and China 3.31. The positive impact of preventative care, periodic examinations, as well as regular access to home facilities for person hygiene in developed countries verses the living conditions in underdeveloped nations may be a contributing factor. Stomach cancer and cancer of the Esophagus tell a different story. The United States and Russia both post between 3 and 4 deaths per hundred thousand for Esophagus Cancer while China and Mongolia post 11.51 and 19.47, respectively. For stomach cancer, the United States shows a relatively low incidence with 2.56 per 100,000 verses Russia- 17.13, China- 18.56, Mongolia- 29.12. African nations are also little scathed by the disease with relatively low numbers; South Africa 3.76, Namibia 1.85 and Central African Republic 2.87. Could the pollution in China be taking its toll on its own people by way of stomach cancer and cancer of the esophagus? There are many interesting comparisons. I believe that food and water quality standards and pollution are contributing factors, as well as the impact of nuclear fallout from tests performed by the US and Russia, along with poverty and inhumane living conditions. Accurate reporting also influences the numbers that we're shown. Consider the WHO reports for victims of drowning for 2018. 11.18 persons per 100,000 died of drowning in Chad, a landlocked country with a terrain of mostly desert, verses the United States, that reported 1.42 per 100,000. In fact, African countries in general posted substantially higher numbers for a loss of life due to drownings than the remainder of the world. What can we do to help? 1. Let's clean up the mess. Radioactive nuclides exist on US soil that should be removed. How? We do not yet have the answer as to how to clean up radioactive residue, other than to bulldoze it and bury it. We need to find a better way. I feel that the federal government and Congress should act to foster the research and development to find these answers as a top priority. The work will prepare us for nuclear confrontation. We need to be able to remove the impact of nuclear attack. The ability to do so will help the US maintain its place as superpower and world leader and will likely act as a deterrent to such events as nuclear confrontation. Decades of air pollution, plastic piled in oceans, polluted waterways and soils in many countries in Asia are a cause of severe harm to our planet and ourselves. Other countries have not kept to the same standards as the US and they need our help. Let's help find them a way to clean up the mess. 2. Let's fight world poverty, as well as illiteracy and a lack of infrastructure in underdeveloped nations. While many of those countries are in Africa, others are located in Asia and other parts of the world. Extending a helping hand will help open new markets and assist so many people around the world with regard to their quality of life, as well as their longevity. 3. Let's improve conditions in the United States through public awareness. Remember the Just Say No program? It was a legacy of Nancy Reagan and was extremely successful, along with DARE in curtailing drug use, including marijuana and heroin use. The numbers fell dramatically from 1978 to 1993. Ironically, both programs were briefly unfunded due to their success. DARE was revised and reinstated. Just Say No was no more. Let's bring it back. Obesity continues to be a problem in this country. I also found that obesity exists in China, and around the world. Let's work towards progress with knowledge. An awareness campaign can make a considerable difference. Any ideas? I would be very happy to hear them. Please feel free to contact me.
With world life expectancy on the rise, the US ranks 46th among all nations with 79.11 years as its average annual lifespan for 2019, according to the United Nations Population Division. The CDC estimates the average life expectancy for Americans at a lower level, 78.6 years, for the same year. Though this country is either near or at the top of the charts in categories such as average income, wealth, standard of living, literacy, education, and housing conditions, concerning longevity- we have a ways to go. Who's number one? Hone Kong, with an average life expectancy of 85.29 years. Women, in fact, across the globe are living longer than men. Women in Hong Kong have the highest life expectancy for the gender of any in the world, trucking on until an average age of 88.17 years. Men in Hong Kong have an average life expectancy of 82.38 years. Japan is second, with an average life expectancy of men and women combined of 85.03, Switzerland (a Democracy) is fourth with 84.25 years, Italy (also a Democracy) 84.01 years, Spain (socialist) 83.99 years. Israel 83.49 years, France 83.13 years, Canada 82.96 years, and the United Kingdom 81.77 years, just to name a few, according to the United Nations. There are very low numbers as well. The shortest life expectancy for a gender of any county in the world is 52.16 average years, referencing men in the Central African Republic. In fact, throughout Africa, most average life expectancies range from the mid fifties to the mid sixties owing to starvation, living conditions and illiteracy. Why does the United States trail industrialized nations in life expectancy by as much as 6 years? Nuclear fallout from live nuclear tests performed by United States, many on US soil, may be part of the reason why. Remember Bikini Atol, Marshall Islands, March, 1954? On March 1, 1954, the United States purposely detonated a hydrogen bomb on the island of Bikini Atol, Marshall Islands. The nuclear test sent nuclear fallout into the air that was carried by weather patterns to the United States, where it landed. Nuclear fallout from nuclear testing was later linked to Leukemia and thyroid cancer in the United States. Live nuclear tests have been performed by the United States on the Marshall Islands and various parts of mainland US from 1947 until 1992, with a four year hiatus from 1958 until 1961. The largest level of nuclear fallout that has ever materialized on US soil was the result of the nuclear test "Storax Sedan" on July 6, 1962 at Area 10, Nevada National Security Site, NV. The test was conducted underground for the purpose of discovering the use of nuclear weapons for peaceful purposes, such as mining. The blast sent 880,000 curries of Iodine 131 into the atmosphere. The biggest man-made crater in the United States was generated measuring 12 meters. In Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota and Illinois, millions of people were exposed to radiation as a result of the blast.
Meanwhile, the number one killer in the United States is heart disease. 655,381 lives were lost to heart disease in 2018. Number two is cancer. The category includes all types of cancer, including Leukemia and Thyroid cancer that are both directly linked to radiation contact. 599,274 persons died of cancer in 2018. Accidents and unintentional injuries were number three for the year with 167,127 persons deceased. Chronic lower respiratory diseases were number four; Cerebrovascular diseases number five, Alzheimer disease number six, and Diabetes number was seven. In 2018 deaths by drug overdose dropped 4.6% from 2017 to 67,367, making the cause of death number eight, if it were counted by the CDC as being within the top ten. The CDC does not post deaths by drug overdose within the top 10, even though the numbers would place them there. The stats post Influenza and pneumonia as number eight for the year with a loss of life totaling 59,120. Why has the CDC decided to drop deaths by drug overdose in their posting of the top 10 causes of death in the US when the number of those lives that were lost would place drug overdose in the listing? I don't know. CNN recently reported that deaths by drug overdose reached a record level of 70,980 for 2019. World Health Rankings - Interactive Map of Countries and Causes of Death
What it is that people die of around the world varies considerably from country to country. In some cases, I've found interesting comparisons in industrialized nations verses underdeveloped countries, and, at times, not what I expected. I found the following information from the World Health Organization for 2018. The numbers pertaining to the loss of life due to alcohol or drug use may be the result of several factors, such as the availability of alcohol or drugs. Of the cross section of the countries that I compared, I found a considerable difference between Russia- with 14.54 deaths per 100,000 due to alcohol and 10.72 deaths per 100,000 due to drug use verses China's .81 per 100,000/Alcohol and 1.84 per 100,000/drug use. Note that both countries are similar in the political and economic framework and exist on the same continent. While people in China clearly do not drink or use drugs in excess, a comparison of the loss of life in Russia, the US and China from Liver Cancer is elliptical to the loss of life from alcohol/drug use. 23.63 persons died of liver cancer during 2018 in China, verses Russia 4.96 and the United States 5.22. The numbers for liver disease for 2018; Russia 20.83, China 8.44 and US 10.69, are consistent with the numbers related to drug and alcohol use. 2.6 persons out of 100,000 are deceased as a result of alcohol and 10.81 per 100,000 from drug use in the United States. Alzheimers/Dementia is prevalent in many countries, including the United States, the United Kingdom, China, as well as Namibia and South Africa, who post mortality due to the disease is between 30 and 37 per 100,000. Russia, Germany, Mongolia, and Brazil show markedly lower numbers for the category, ranging between 10 and 20. The loss of life due to Asthma varies considerably from the United States, United Kingdom, Russia, China, Germany and others whose numbers range between .6 and 1.5 per 100,000, verses South Africa, Namibia, Mali and other African nations who loose as many as 23 persons per 100,000 over the same time frame. The loss of life in India due to asthma is also considerably higher than other industrialized nations at 16.77. Lack of medical devices and care is very likely the reason for the anomaly, as persons who dwell in industrialized nations tend to have further contact with air pollution and are, in fact, experiencing far fewer incidents of death due to the condition. I’ve found that China and Mongolia and some other countries are relatively unscathed by the certain types of cancers, including breast cancer, Uterin and Prostate Cancer. Concerning breast cancer, Russia, the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany and a number of African countries have similar numbers posting between 17 and 23 deaths per 100,000 while China and Mongolia experience a loss of life less than 6 per 100,000 for the disease. The impact of live nuclear testing in the United States and Russia could account for most of the phenomenon. Pollution, lack of available clean water or sanitation may account for the elevated numbers in the Central African Republic and other African Nations. African nations post relatively high numbers for Cervical Cancer; Tanzania 35.6, Mali 33.23, South Africa 18.31 verses the United States 3.21 and Germany 1.91 as well as Russia 6.35 and China 3.31. The positive impact of preventative care, periodic examinations, as well as regular access to home facilities for person hygiene in developed countries verses the living conditions in underdeveloped nations may be a contributing factor. Stomach cancer and cancer of the Esophagus tell a different story. The United States and Russia both post between 3 and 4 deaths per hundred thousand for Esophagus Cancer while China and Mongolia post 11.51 and 19.47, respectively. For stomach cancer, the United States shows a relatively low incidence with 2.56 per 100,000 verses Russia- 17.13, China- 18.56, Mongolia- 29.12. African nations are also little scathed by the disease with relatively low numbers; South Africa 3.76, Namibia 1.85 and Central African Republic 2.87. Could the pollution in China be taking its toll on its own people by way of stomach cancer and cancer of the esophagus? There are many interesting comparisons. I believe that food and water quality standards and pollution are contributing factors, as well as the impact of nuclear fallout from tests performed by the US and Russia, along with poverty and inhumane living conditions. Accurate reporting also influences the numbers that we're shown. Consider the WHO reports for victims of drowning for 2018. 11.18 persons per 100,000 died of drowning in Chad, a landlocked country with a terrain of mostly desert, verses the United States, that reported 1.42 per 100,000. In fact, African countries in general posted substantially higher numbers for a loss of life due to drownings than the remainder of the world. What can we do to help? 1. Let's clean up the mess. Radioactive nuclides exist on US soil that should be removed. How? We do not yet have the answer as to how to clean up radioactive residue, other than to bulldoze it and bury it. We need to find a better way. I feel that the federal government and Congress should act to foster the research and development to find these answers as a top priority. The work will prepare us for nuclear confrontation. We need to be able to remove the impact of nuclear attack. The ability to do so will help the US maintain its place as superpower and world leader and will likely act as a deterrent to such events as nuclear confrontation. Decades of air pollution, plastic piled in oceans, polluted waterways and soils in many countries in Asia are a cause of severe harm to our planet and ourselves. Other countries have not kept to the same standards as the US and they need our help. Let's help find them a way to clean up the mess. 2. Let's fight world poverty, as well as illiteracy and a lack of infrastructure in underdeveloped nations. While many of those countries are in Africa, others are located in Asia and other parts of the world. Extending a helping hand will help open new markets and assist so many people around the world with regard to their quality of life, as well as their longevity. 3. Let's improve conditions in the United States through public awareness. Remember the Just Say No program? It was a legacy of Nancy Reagan and was extremely successful, along with DARE in curtailing drug use, including marijuana and heroin use. The numbers fell dramatically from 1978 to 1993. Ironically, both programs were briefly unfunded due to their success. DARE was revised and reinstated. Just Say No was no more. Let's bring it back. Obesity continues to be a problem in this country. I also found that obesity exists in China, and around the world. Let's work towards progress with knowledge. An awareness campaign can make a considerable difference. Any ideas? I would be very happy to hear them. Please feel free to contact me.
With world life expectancy on the rise, the US ranks 46th among all nations with 79.11 years as its average annual lifespan for 2019, according to the United Nations Population Division. The CDC estimates the average life expectancy for Americans at a lower level, 78.6 years, for the same year. Though this country is either near or at the top of the charts in categories such as average income, wealth, standard of living, literacy, education, and housing conditions, concerning longevity- we have a ways to go. Who's number one? Hone Kong, with an average life expectancy of 85.29 years. Women, in fact, across the globe are living longer than men. Women in Hong Kong have the highest life expectancy for the gender of any in the world, trucking on until an average age of 88.17 years. Men in Hong Kong have an average life expectancy of 82.38 years. Japan is second, with an average life expectancy of men and women combined of 85.03, Switzerland (a Democracy) is fourth with 84.25 years, Italy (also a Democracy) 84.01 years, Spain (socialist) 83.99 years. Israel 83.49 years, France 83.13 years, Canada 82.96 years, and the United Kingdom 81.77 years, just to name a few, according to the United Nations. There are very low numbers as well. The shortest life expectancy for a gender of any county in the world is 52.16 average years, referencing men in the Central African Republic. In fact, throughout Africa, most average life expectancies range from the mid fifties to the mid sixties owing to starvation, living conditions and illiteracy. Why does the United States trail industrialized nations in life expectancy by as much as 6 years? Nuclear fallout from live nuclear tests performed by United States, many on US soil, may be part of the reason why. Remember Bikini Atol, Marshall Islands, March, 1954? On March 1, 1954, the United States purposely detonated a hydrogen bomb on the island of Bikini Atol, Marshall Islands. The nuclear test sent nuclear fallout into the air that was carried by weather patterns to the United States, where it landed. Nuclear fallout from nuclear testing was later linked to Leukemia and thyroid cancer in the United States. Live nuclear tests have been performed by the United States on the Marshall Islands and various parts of mainland US from 1947 until 1992, with a four year hiatus from 1958 until 1961. The largest level of nuclear fallout that has ever materialized on US soil was the result of the nuclear test "Storax Sedan" on July 6, 1962 at Area 10, Nevada National Security Site, NV. The test was conducted underground for the purpose of discovering the use of nuclear weapons for peaceful purposes, such as mining. The blast sent 880,000 curries of Iodine 131 into the atmosphere. The biggest man-made crater in the United States was generated measuring 12 meters. In Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota and Illinois, millions of people were exposed to radiation as a result of the blast.
Meanwhile, the number one killer in the United States is heart disease. 655,381 lives were lost to heart disease in 2018. Number two is cancer. The category includes all types of cancer, including Leukemia and Thyroid cancer that are both directly linked to radiation contact. 599,274 persons died of cancer in 2018. Accidents and unintentional injuries were number three for the year with 167,127 persons deceased. Chronic lower respiratory diseases were number four; Cerebrovascular diseases number five, Alzheimer disease number six, and Diabetes number was seven. In 2018 deaths by drug overdose dropped 4.6% from 2017 to 67,367, making the cause of death number eight, if it were counted by the CDC as being within the top ten. The CDC does not post deaths by drug overdose within the top 10, even though the numbers would place them there. The stats post Influenza and pneumonia as number eight for the year with a loss of life totaling 59,120. Why has the CDC decided to drop deaths by drug overdose in their posting of the top 10 causes of death in the US when the number of those lives that were lost would place drug overdose in the listing? I don't know. CNN recently reported that deaths by drug overdose reached a record level of 70,980 for 2019. World Health Rankings - Interactive Map of Countries and Causes of Death
What it is that people die of around the world varies considerably from country to country. In some cases, I've found interesting comparisons in industrialized nations verses underdeveloped countries, and, at times, not what I expected. I found the following information from the World Health Organization for 2018. The numbers pertaining to the loss of life due to alcohol or drug use may be the result of several factors, such as the availability of alcohol or drugs. Of the cross section of the countries that I compared, I found a considerable difference between Russia- with 14.54 deaths per 100,000 due to alcohol and 10.72 deaths per 100,000 due to drug use verses China's .81 per 100,000/Alcohol and 1.84 per 100,000/drug use. Note that both countries are similar in the political and economic framework and exist on the same continent. While people in China clearly do not drink or use drugs in excess, a comparison of the loss of life in Russia, the US and China from Liver Cancer is elliptical to the loss of life from alcohol/drug use. 23.63 persons died of liver cancer during 2018 in China, verses Russia 4.96 and the United States 5.22. The numbers for liver disease for 2018; Russia 20.83, China 8.44 and US 10.69, are consistent with the numbers related to drug and alcohol use. 2.6 persons out of 100,000 are deceased as a result of alcohol and 10.81 per 100,000 from drug use in the United States. Alzheimers/Dementia is prevalent in many countries, including the United States, the United Kingdom, China, as well as Namibia and South Africa, who post mortality due to the disease is between 30 and 37 per 100,000. Russia, Germany, Mongolia, and Brazil show markedly lower numbers for the category, ranging between 10 and 20. The loss of life due to Asthma varies considerably from the United States, United Kingdom, Russia, China, Germany and others whose numbers range between .6 and 1.5 per 100,000, verses South Africa, Namibia, Mali and other African nations who loose as many as 23 persons per 100,000 over the same time frame. The loss of life in India due to asthma is also considerably higher than other industrialized nations at 16.77. Lack of medical devices and care is very likely the reason for the anomaly, as persons who dwell in industrialized nations tend to have further contact with air pollution and are, in fact, experiencing far fewer incidents of death due to the condition. I’ve found that China and Mongolia and some other countries are relatively unscathed by the certain types of cancers, including breast cancer, Uterin and Prostate Cancer. Concerning breast cancer, Russia, the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany and a number of African countries have similar numbers posting between 17 and 23 deaths per 100,000 while China and Mongolia experience a loss of life less than 6 per 100,000 for the disease. The impact of live nuclear testing in the United States and Russia could account for most of the phenomenon. Pollution, lack of available clean water or sanitation may account for the elevated numbers in the Central African Republic and other African Nations. African nations post relatively high numbers for Cervical Cancer; Tanzania 35.6, Mali 33.23, South Africa 18.31 verses the United States 3.21 and Germany 1.91 as well as Russia 6.35 and China 3.31. The positive impact of preventative care, periodic examinations, as well as regular access to home facilities for person hygiene in developed countries verses the living conditions in underdeveloped nations may be a contributing factor. Stomach cancer and cancer of the Esophagus tell a different story. The United States and Russia both post between 3 and 4 deaths per hundred thousand for Esophagus Cancer while China and Mongolia post 11.51 and 19.47, respectively. For stomach cancer, the United States shows a relatively low incidence with 2.56 per 100,000 verses Russia- 17.13, China- 18.56, Mongolia- 29.12. African nations are also little scathed by the disease with relatively low numbers; South Africa 3.76, Namibia 1.85 and Central African Republic 2.87. Could the pollution in China be taking its toll on its own people by way of stomach cancer and cancer of the esophagus? There are many interesting comparisons. I believe that food and water quality standards and pollution are contributing factors, as well as the impact of nuclear fallout from tests performed by the US and Russia, along with poverty and inhumane living conditions. Accurate reporting also influences the numbers that we're shown. Consider the WHO reports for victims of drowning for 2018. 11.18 persons per 100,000 died of drowning in Chad, a landlocked country with a terrain of mostly desert, verses the United States, that reported 1.42 per 100,000. In fact, African countries in general posted substantially higher numbers for a loss of life due to drownings than the remainder of the world. What can we do to help? 1. Let's clean up the mess. Radioactive nuclides exist on US soil that should be removed. How? We do not yet have the answer as to how to clean up radioactive residue, other than to bulldoze it and bury it. We need to find a better way. I feel that the federal government and Congress should act to foster the research and development to find these answers as a top priority. The work will prepare us for nuclear confrontation. We need to be able to remove the impact of nuclear attack. The ability to do so will help the US maintain its place as superpower and world leader and will likely act as a deterrent to such events as nuclear confrontation. Decades of air pollution, plastic piled in oceans, polluted waterways and soils in many countries in Asia are a cause of severe harm to our planet and ourselves. Other countries have not kept to the same standards as the US and they need our help. Let's help find them a way to clean up the mess. 2. Let's fight world poverty, as well as illiteracy and a lack of infrastructure in underdeveloped nations. While many of those countries are in Africa, others are located in Asia and other parts of the world. Extending a helping hand will help open new markets and assist so many people around the world with regard to their quality of life, as well as their longevity. 3. Let's improve conditions in the United States through public awareness. Remember the Just Say No program? It was a legacy of Nancy Reagan and was extremely successful, along with DARE in curtailing drug use, including marijuana and heroin use. The numbers fell dramatically from 1978 to 1993. Ironically, both programs were briefly unfunded due to their success. DARE was revised and reinstated. Just Say No was no more. Let's bring it back. Obesity continues to be a problem in this country. I also found that obesity exists in China, and around the world. Let's work towards progress with knowledge. An awareness campaign can make a considerable difference. Any ideas? I would be very happy to hear them. Please feel free to contact me.